Athletic Training – Sento Soft http://sentosoft.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 03:27:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sentosoft.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Athletic Training – Sento Soft http://sentosoft.com/ 32 32 More Cheerleaders Allege Abuse by Former NDSU Cheer Coach https://sentosoft.com/more-cheerleaders-allege-abuse-by-former-ndsu-cheer-coach/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 02:04:00 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/more-cheerleaders-allege-abuse-by-former-ndsu-cheer-coach/ FARGO, ND (Valley News Live) – Cheerleaders have surged in allegations following the retirement of former North Dakota State University cheer coach Verona Winkler. This investigation began in late August when we received a message on our whistleblower hotline alleging that Winkler was coaching with emotional and verbal abuse. In 2018, a group of NDSU […]]]>

FARGO, ND (Valley News Live) – Cheerleaders have surged in allegations following the retirement of former North Dakota State University cheer coach Verona Winkler. This investigation began in late August when we received a message on our whistleblower hotline alleging that Winkler was coaching with emotional and verbal abuse.

In 2018, a group of NDSU cheerleaders spoke out against Winkler, claiming physical, emotional, and verbal abuse.

“Everyone was really scared of her the whole time,” said Chani Tretbar, a former NDSU cheerleader from 2015-18.

“I really thought when my teammates went in and had their exit interviews and told them next year was going to be so much better and we were going to have such good energy and culture and instead we were told that our teammates lied and our teammates weren’t honest in their exit interviews,” said Allie Bolin, a former NDSU cheerleader from 2017-19.

Ricky Paulson, who was the NDSU cheerleader from 2016 to 2018, suffered a contused hip and received a medical certificate for the injury. He said Winkler didn’t care about the injury and forced him to perform during a basketball game.

“I figured I would just stand on the sidelines and not have to do anything,” Paulson said. “But when she asked me to go up the pyramid, we were all a bit taken aback that not only did I have to have someone on my shoulders, I had to throw them up there. That’s a lot of torque. It was definitely painful to have to do that.”

In 2009, Stephanie Vickhammer was a student-athlete and was in Winkler’s Cheer program. She said Winkler would not allow them to see athletic training staff if they had injuries, a claim made by many other former cheerleaders.

“It just wasn’t right for me to see how many injuries occurred and not being able to see the sports training staff because I honestly think they didn’t want the documentation of the number of injuries that occurred,” said Vichammer.

Vickhammer said she spoke to the athletic department but nothing came of it. The NDSU Sports Department. denied on numerous occasions having known about these allegations. However, a former cheerleader has provided us with a taped 2018 phone call between a former cheerleader and assistant athletic director Colleen Heimstead.

“Well, we met Verona about your concerns,” Heimstead said on a taped phone call. “I can’t imagine she benching you for coming to see us.”

Chani Tretbar was another cheerleader who spoke out against Winkler in 2018. She said she suffered numerous instances of emotional and verbal abuse at the hands of Winkler. Which led to her struggling with her mental health.

“I tried starving myself, but that just didn’t do her any good,” said Tretbar, who was an NDSU cheerleader from 2015 to 2018. “Unfortunately, I went to the only other thing I could control and caused external pain on myself to take away things I couldn’t control with my performance. It was really a destructive attempt to deal with it.”

“I’m not afraid of her, no. She can’t touch me,” said Alaina Werlinger, a 2019-21 NDSU cheerleader. “I have a great job, I have a great boyfriend, I live in a house, I have two dogs. My parents are on my side, my sister is on my side. No one is on her side that I care about and she ruined my college track experience and she ruined it for so many other people and she deserves what’s coming her way.

“She’s had every opportunity to change her behavior, every opportunity to change and become a better coach, and I only wish she had done that sooner for the rest of us,” Bolin said.

We went to Winkler’s house to give her the opportunity to tell her side of the story. Although there were people in the house, no one opened the door. We also contacted the NDSU sports department. for interviews on these allegations.

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Son Heung-min trains with a face mask ahead of South Korea’s opener against Uruguay https://sentosoft.com/son-heung-min-trains-with-a-face-mask-ahead-of-south-koreas-opener-against-uruguay/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 09:53:21 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/son-heung-min-trains-with-a-face-mask-ahead-of-south-koreas-opener-against-uruguay/ South Korea’s Son Heung-min has been pictured wearing a face mask while training – raising hopes he will be available for the start of the World Cup. The Tottenham Hotspur forward has been out of action since breaking an eye socket in his club’s Champions League game against Marseille. He underwent surgery on the damaged […]]]>

South Korea’s Son Heung-min has been pictured wearing a face mask while training – raising hopes he will be available for the start of the World Cup.

The Tottenham Hotspur forward has been out of action since breaking an eye socket in his club’s Champions League game against Marseille. He underwent surgery on the damaged area after that game earlier this month.

Son did not play in any of Tottenham’s three games before the World Cup break.

But now he has been spotted training with his South Korean team-mates while wearing a mask, suggesting he will be ready to play for his nation when they face Uruguay next Thursday.

Taking to Instagram last week, he wrote: “Playing for your country at the World Cup is the dream of so many kids growing up as was one of mine. I won’t miss that for anything in the world. I can’t wait to represent our beautiful country, see you soon.”

South Korea’s head coach Paulo Bento also said: “We have to analyze his situation day by day.

“We have time to decide and the most important thing is that he recovers as much as possible, he is comfortable and then we will make the final decision.”

Son is a key player for his country going into the tournament. He has scored 35 goals in 104 senior-level games for the country.

go deeper

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How serious is Son Heung-min’s broken eye socket?

(Photo: Getty Images)

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Immaculata students participate in mass casualty simulation to practice life saving skills https://sentosoft.com/immaculata-students-participate-in-mass-casualty-simulation-to-practice-life-saving-skills/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 10:27:06 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/immaculata-students-participate-in-mass-casualty-simulation-to-practice-life-saving-skills/ Image via Immaculata University. Immaculata students at the mass sacrifice simulation event. As demonstrated in a mass casualty simulation event at Immaculata University on Oct. 18, when a disaster strikes, first responders—whether seasoned paramedics or inquisitive nursing and physical education students—put aside fear and begin to act to save lives. The simulated accident scene, staged […]]]>

Image via Immaculata University.

Immaculata students at the mass sacrifice simulation event.

As demonstrated in a mass casualty simulation event at Immaculata University on Oct. 18, when a disaster strikes, first responders—whether seasoned paramedics or inquisitive nursing and physical education students—put aside fear and begin to act to save lives.

The simulated accident scene, staged as a four-car collision with multiple victims, helped Immaculata students practice their life-saving skills in a realistic mess.

Seventeen students had been assigned to play various clinical conditions and injuries while three Master of Athletic Training students and two Bachelor of Science in Nursing students served as first responders and 30 other BSN students worked in emergency rooms.

“I wanted them to be able to triage patients appropriately during a disaster simulation and provide care based on that level of triage and the patient’s needs,” said Suzanne Wurster, assistant professor of nursing.

She and Michele Monaco, professor of exercise science, as well as other nursing and sports training faculties worked together to design and run the mass-casualty simulation.

“The ability to quickly identify life-threatening injuries and treat them appropriately provides life-saving treatment,” Monaco said. Because a sham patient had an open fracture of the femur with profuse arterial bleeding, “our students were able to determine that this injury takes precedence and quickly apply a tourniquet to stop the bleeding.”

Students used a color system and tags to categorize the urgency of dummy patients’ needs—green for patients with minor ailments; yellow for patients with serious injuries who could still breathe and speak; red for patients who required immediate treatment for serious problems such as loss of consciousness, shortness of breath or neurological symptoms; and black for victims who did not survive the accident.

“Our students were able to identify the injuries with very little prompting,” Monaco said. “They were able to identify head injuries, fractures, dislocations, disorientation and various types of bleeding.”

First Responder students brought mock patients with stretchers and wheelchairs into Immaculata’s simulation labs, each with a specific triage color, where nursing majors checked patients’ tags and administered treatment. Nine members of the nursing faculty served as physicians and shared with the students simulated vital signs and test results of sham patients and invited them to make decisions based on their observations and the clinical data obtained.

After the simulation was over, the nursing faculty and members of the EMS team consulted with the students in a nursing leadership class. Matt Cole, EMS Captain, congratulated the students on a great job amidst the chaos. Since some dummy patients died as part of the simulation, he reassured the students that it’s okay to grieve over the loss of people. “Ask for help when you need it,” he said. “It’s not a shame. Mental health is important.”

Immaculata offers a variety of healthcare programs that equip students with the knowledge and skills to provide holistic, patient-centric, evidence-based care. Immaculata’s nursing students consistently achieve high pass rates for the nursing license exam, with 90.48 percent of students passing the exam on the first attempt in the 2021-22 school year. Immaculata’s first class of Master of Athletic Training students will graduate this spring and upon completion of coursework and six clinical training experiences will take their athletic training certification exam to learn how to prevent, diagnose and treat various musculoskeletal and medical conditions.

Learn more about Immaculata University.

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First Generation Scholars: Rowan Hosts Inaugural Ceremony for Honor Society | mountain ash today https://sentosoft.com/first-generation-scholars-rowan-hosts-inaugural-ceremony-for-honor-society-mountain-ash-today/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 18:48:56 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/first-generation-scholars-rowan-hosts-inaugural-ceremony-for-honor-society-mountain-ash-today/ Alexa Diamond was the first of the first. She welcomed the moment, both for what it meant and what it will mean. “I really appreciate everything up to this moment,” said Diamant (right, second from right), a sophomore with a writing major at Rowan University and an aspiring novelist. “It makes me really proud to […]]]>

Alexa Diamond was the first of the first. She welcomed the moment, both for what it meant and what it will mean.

“I really appreciate everything up to this moment,” said Diamant (right, second from right), a sophomore with a writing major at Rowan University and an aspiring novelist.

“It makes me really proud to be standing here. I’m proving to myself that I can do it.”

During a ceremony on November 7, Diamond was the first Rowan student to walk the stage to accept induction into the inaugural class of the Delta Tau chapter of Alpha Alpha Alpha, the national honor society that recognizes first-generation students for academic excellence.

A total of 63 students were accepted into the Society, which was founded in Rowan this year. Each student signed an introductory book and received a pin and certificate. Upon assuming office, they will wear the pin and cord of honor to demonstrate their status as first-generation scholars.

First-generation students are students whose parents, step-parents or legal guardians have not completed their Matura studies. To be accepted into Tri-Alpha, first-generation students must have a 3.2 or higher grade point average over 30 semester hours.

Hard work, resilience, dedication, mentoring others

While the Society welcomed students, Rowan’s President, Ali A. Houshmand, was himself a proud “First Gen”, Tri-Alpha’s first and only faculty/staff.

Houshmand speaks“I call myself an extreme first generation,” said Houshmand (left), who shared his story with insiders. Houshmand, now in the 10thth year as President of the third fastest growing public research university in the country, grew up in Iran as one of 10 children of illiterate parents in poor circumstances.

Those who succeed, Houshmand said, are driven by tenacity and determination.

“Each of you has the ability to achieve anything you want,” he said. “I hope you believe in yourself. Dream crazy dreams.”

Houshmand was the perfect choice as Tri-Alpha’s first faculty/staff candidate because he exemplifies hard work, resilience, dedication and mentoring others, “that’s the best service a first-generation graduate can provide,” said Penny McPherson Myers, Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Co-Chair of Rowan’s First Generation Task Force.

During the ceremony, Houshmand also accepted the charter presented to Rowan by Tri-Alpha National Headquarters to officially welcome the chapter to campus.

“Lighting the way for others to follow”

Tri-Alpha advisor Joe Lizza, also a first-generation college graduate, explained the symbolism of the chapter’s seal, which contains a star surrounded by multiple circles.

“The circles indicate the different communities that you belong to — the Rowan University community, the Glassboro community in southern New Jersey, and the wider region and world community,” Lizza said.

“The star represents you as a star in your family, leading the way for others to follow your example into higher education. Remember that you are that beacon to someone else and that you have a responsibility to lead others to the light.”

Staci HaafThis resonated with psychology major Staci Haaf (middle right). She attended the ceremony with her sons (from left), Bobby, 16, who is pursuing a career in athletic training, and Carter, 13, who is considering becoming a lawyer. Both have their sights set on Rowan for her undergraduate studies.

“I’m very proud of her,” beamed Bobby. “I want to follow in their footsteps”

“Celebrate this moment”

Julius Grayson, a member of the Tri-Alpha Advisory Board, led the students in the Society’s initiation pledge.

It said, in part, “By accepting membership in the Tri-Alpha Honor Society, you accept a responsibility to help others as you have been helped, or as you may wish you had been helped, to serve as mentors and Serving guides for the next group of students entering a college campus.”

Amy Ruymann, director of university advisory services, co-chair of the First-Generation Task Force, encouraged candidates to enjoy their achievements.

The Tri-Alpha Advisory Board includes Lizza, McPherson-Myers, Ruymann, Grayson, Atla Wells, Melissa Meireles and Nancy Demaris.

“I hope you remember this moment and celebrate it,” said Ruymann. “You belong here. And we are all connected, in the Tri-Alpha Society and in the Rowan community. You are the star and we are part of your circle.”

The Alpha Alpha Honor Society’s first induction ceremony was a highlight of Rowan’s First-Gen Celebration Week.

The university’s Flying First program provides resources and programs for students, family members and Rowan faculty. Last year, the university was named a First-Gen Forward Institution by the Center for First-Generation Student Success.

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Concerns about sports training facility in Morris Township https://sentosoft.com/concerns-about-sports-training-facility-in-morris-township/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 21:55:52 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/concerns-about-sports-training-facility-in-morris-township/ MORRIS TOWNSHIP, NJ — The New York Red Bulls’ proposal to build a training facility on the Columbia Turnpike is back on the agenda of Morris Township’s planning committee, adding to the already lengthy permitting process. In recent months, the Red Bulls have presented their possible site plans for the training ground to the planning […]]]>

MORRIS TOWNSHIP, NJ — The New York Red Bulls’ proposal to build a training facility on the Columbia Turnpike is back on the agenda of Morris Township’s planning committee, adding to the already lengthy permitting process.

In recent months, the Red Bulls have presented their possible site plans for the training ground to the planning committee and the public, including statements from the project architect and the landscape architect.

At a recent meeting, Kristin Byrd, one of the project architects, discussed updates to the new facility’s exterior design. According to Byrd, the facility will include nine separate buildings as well as an attached dormitory.

The main building, which is expected to be four stories high, will house the players and coaches of the professional teams, as well as the student residences and all academy facilities and operations.

The Red Bulls’ attorney claims the team is doing everything possible to minimize any negative impact on the community, although there is a slim chance there will be no impact at all. For example, Byrd described how the architectural team deliberately reduced the height of the main building on the side facing the residential complex in order to make it more level.

Last year, the team announced plans to build the training facility on the 80-acre site on Columbia Road, but the process has yet to progress beyond the planning board. Residents in the area have expressed concern about the project, fearing the increased lighting and noise levels from the speaker system will disrupt the neighborhood.

The Red Bulls have spent time revising their project plans after receiving feedback at previous public meetings and that community engagement is expected to continue throughout the process, officials said.

Local residents who live nearby are concerned about the increase in nighttime or late night lighting. The New York Red Bulls Training Facility sign, which is expected to be 6 feet tall and 118 feet long, will also be illuminated along with the overhead lights, according to Byrd.

However, the Red Bulls team intends to add fences as well as other measures such as a “plant buffer” with various trees to block some of the overhead light from the surrounding neighborhoods.

Richard Tangel, a local resident, was one of many to speak out on the visible lighting issue. “These renderings show visible light from afar. The previous expert said no illumination but he agrees he sees the illumination now so you have a discontinuity between experts here.”

The rendering of the expected lights can be viewed here.

Construction of the facility was slated to begin later this year, with an initial completion date of 2024. That schedule is now unlikely as development plans call for three two-year construction phases to complete the project.

The new facility would house the Red Bulls first team as well as the USL’s Red Bulls II, as well as the academy and other youth programs, making it North America’s premier youth football development system.

The public hearing on the project, where several local residents expressed their concerns, is scheduled to resume at 7pm tonight

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Branford Star Student Athlete Antonio shines on and off the field https://sentosoft.com/branford-star-student-athlete-antonio-shines-on-and-off-the-field/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 09:33:38 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/branford-star-student-athlete-antonio-shines-on-and-off-the-field/ BRANFORD, CT – We all know student athletes who take their A-game to other areas of their lives. Here at Patch, we created Help Patch Spotlight CT Student Athletes Who Are Also Good Kids, an initiative to recognize these heroes who are making a difference in their communities. We’re working on letting all of your […]]]>

BRANFORD, CT – We all know student athletes who take their A-game to other areas of their lives.

Here at Patch, we created Help Patch Spotlight CT Student Athletes Who Are Also Good Kids, an initiative to recognize these heroes who are making a difference in their communities. We’re working on letting all of your neighbors know about the individual stories behind the leaderboard.

This submission is from Paul Lynk, who nominated Antonio of Branford.

Name of star student athlete

Antonio

Home state of the star student athlete

Connecticut

Star Student Athlete’s Patch City

branford

How do you know the star student athlete?

He is my son

What kind of sport does the star student athlete do?

baseball

Why do you think the star student athlete should be recognised?

Antonio is a great student athlete. He is a High Honors student at Branford High School, where he is currently a sophomore in the graduating class of 2025. He is committed to his academics and genuinely enjoys science and chemistry. When the pandemic hit and everyone was homeschooling, he was still thriving, receiving an award for excellence in language arts as well as an award for excellence in dedicated distance learning. He is very interested in athletic training (baseball-specific strength training) and nutrition. Antonio volunteered with the Branford Little League this summer to help out and share his passion for baseball with the younger kids at Branford baseball camp. Antonio is very humble, outgoing and always willing to help anyone with anything. Antonio played varsity baseball at Branford High School as a freshman and won Rookie of the Year. Well liked by his classmates and teachers, Antonio strives to be a great friend, teammate and student. He is a very good, kind-hearted boy who, despite all his achievements, remains humble and supports his fellow students and teammates. He’s a great student athlete who works hard at everything he does. He definitely deserves recognition as an outstanding student athlete.

What should everyone know about the star student athlete?

One thing everyone should know about Antonio is that he never cuts corners. He gets the job done, whether in the classroom or in the field. He knows that excellence on and off the field only comes with hard work, training and dedication. His academics always come first. He says that you are a student first. Then an athlete. He’s very respectful and polite to everyone, and he’s always willing to go the extra mile. He’s a great kid!

Keep it up Antonio!

This content is brought to our community in partnership with T-Mobile.

Do you know an outstanding student athlete? Nominate her as a Patch Star Student Athlete.

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XFL officially announces Guardians as the name for Orlando’s team https://sentosoft.com/xfl-officially-announces-guardians-as-the-name-for-orlandos-team/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 19:51:00 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/xfl-officially-announces-guardians-as-the-name-for-orlandos-team/ ORLANDO, Fla. — The XFL officially announced the name and logo for Orlando’s XFL team — the Guardians — on Monday. what you need to know The XFL officially announced Orlando’s team name as the Guardians The football league unveiled the team names and logos of its eight teams The Guardians play at Camping World […]]]>

ORLANDO, Fla. — The XFL officially announced the name and logo for Orlando’s XFL team — the Guardians — on Monday.


what you need to know

  • The XFL officially announced Orlando’s team name as the Guardians
  • The football league unveiled the team names and logos of its eight teams
  • The Guardians play at Camping World Stadium
  • The league will play in early 2023

The move was part of a larger announcement for all eight football teams in the league. The other teams are the Arlington Renegades, Houston Roughnecks, San Antonio Brahmas, St. Louis Battlehawks, DC Defenders, Seattle Sea Dragons and the Vegas Vipers, the league said.

League operations are scheduled to begin on February 18, 2023.

The Guardians play at Camping World Stadium, tickets start at $20. Season ticket deposits are accepted on XFL.com.

“The Guardians have landed in Orlando and I’m back in the Sunshine State to lead the way for our fans with smart, fast and fearless football,” said head coach Terrell Buckley. “Visiting teams better prepare for a sea of ​​green guarding Camping World Stadium.”

Ahead of the weekend’s games, teams train and practice at the league’s Football Operations Hub in Arlington, Texas.

Consisting of a central performance facility and multiple practice sites for pre-season and midweek training, the center offers players access to full-time on-site support from coaches and athletic training staff.

The coaching staff is now scouting potential players in preparation for the XFL draft in November.

ESPN announced in May that all regular-season and playoff XFL games will be broadcast on ESPN and other networks owned by The Walt Disney Company under a multi-year agreement.

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Student athletes mull a return to traditional off-season training – The Williams Record https://sentosoft.com/student-athletes-mull-a-return-to-traditional-off-season-training-the-williams-record/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 04:55:53 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/student-athletes-mull-a-return-to-traditional-off-season-training-the-williams-record/ NESCAC has withdrawn its policy allowing teams to train with their coaches during the off-season. (cadence Li/The Williams record) NCAA and NESCAC policy, which allowed teams to conduct off-season drills with their coaches in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, expired this fall, marking a return to traditional regulations for off-season games that Team trainings require […]]]>
NESCAC has withdrawn its policy allowing teams to train with their coaches during the off-season. (cadence Li/The Williams record)

NCAA and NESCAC policy, which allowed teams to conduct off-season drills with their coaches in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, expired this fall, marking a return to traditional regulations for off-season games that Team trainings require to be optional and exercises to be planned and held without coaches involved.

To maintain skill during the off-season while adhering to these rules, teams meet for captain-led drills and adhere to strength-training programs. Athletes from four teams reflected on the opportunity off-season training presents to build community and hone their skills.

Athletic director Lisa Melendy told the record in May that the relaxed regulations on off-season training between fall 2020 and spring 2022 were a temporary policy in response to COVID. “[That] was a one-time response from COVID to support student and athlete wellbeing on many fronts,” she wrote.

Many players have cited off-season training as an opportunity to build team dynamics alongside skills. For the Morgan Persky ’23 volleyball team co-captain, shifts in attending postseason activities — due to athletes going abroad in the postseason or leaving the team — allowed Persky to try her hand at leadership last spring before she became captain this fall.

“We’re trying very hard to make it a classless group,” she said. “Last spring there were three out of six girls in my youth class who didn’t go abroad [total juniors], so we did the exercises. Two of us became captains after that, so [the off-season] helped that transition in a very natural way.”

For spring sports, there is a training session led by the captain in the pre-season. Lacrosse player Nicole Toney ’23 noted that the captain-led practice phase in the fall leading up to the spring lacrosse season allowed for collaborative team leadership. “This year we have few juniors because some of them are doing their fall or winter sports and the others are all abroad – [the team is] really only second graders [first-years]and seniors,” she said.

Toney also emphasized the collaborative nature of off-season training for those in attendance. “Everyone has a voice about what we can do,” Toney said.

In addition to strengthening technique in practice and strengthening team lifts, Toney said captain-led preseason practice also promotes team bonding. “I feel like it’s a privilege to train in a spring sport off-season because you have so much time to develop the chemistry and your team and get to know each other in such a casual way,” she said. “You’re out there to work hard — but you’re also getting to know each other, learning about everyone’s inclinations, and just having fun together.”

Men’s Nordic skiing captain Jacob Jampel ’23 also attributed the closer bonds between the athletes to the time they spent at off-season training sessions, where ski teams headed to the trails and engaged in activities like roller skiing, Cycling and cross training form team marathons. “I love that we have so many different interests on the team and people have had very different approaches to cross-training,” he said. “People just love showing up to enjoy each other’s company and to be outside together.”

The return to tightened off-season regulations has meant an increase in logistical responsibility for team captains, some athletes said. Lilly Bates ’23, co-captain of women’s Nordic skiing, said that in addition to planning and leading practices, she works with her co-captains to coordinate transportation to the ski slopes as the college in is not allowed to offer any transport during the off-season.

“It’s never been a challenge, but it’s just assumed that this will happen every year – that there will be enough people with cars and licenses and people who are comfortable driving a full car of their teammates and for gas too pay,” she said. Now that the ski season has officially started, the coaches take care of all the transportation and the captains can take on a different role of liaison between the coaches and the other athletes.

Although most of the college’s teams compete in the NESCAC conference, the alpine and Nordic ski teams compete in the Eastern Intercollegiate Ski Association (EISA) – a conference in Div. I the NCAA. Other NESCAC ski teams – Bates, Bowdoin, Colby and Middlebury – also compete in EISA. Melendy explained that because the NESCAC conference changed the allowable game and practice season for the College, Div. III teams not in the NESCAC and Div. I Schools participating in the EISA conference, such as Boston College and Harvard, are not subject to the same NCAA or NESCAC restrictions on off-season coach-led training. “NESCAC has a shorter allowable playing and training season than the NCAA for Div. III… Sport Directors and NESCAC Presidents discuss [out-of-season trainings] frequent, particularly because it deviates from what the rest of Div. III does,” Melendy wrote in an email to the record.

According to Lilly Bates, this policy increases the pressure on off-season training. “[Transportation has] never been a problem and it’s super fun to ride all together – but we try to compete against div. I programs that have coaching throughout the year,” Bates said. “We just have to make this work because we don’t get that support from college until the season.”

Although NCAA and NESCAC policy allows student-athletes to schedule workouts in the weight room during the offseason, Melendy noted that athletic department support must end there to comply with regulations. “There are very strict NCAA rules governing what can and cannot happen during the designated playing and training season…For the most part, the department cannot schedule or support off-season training,” she wrote.

According to Jampel, who was also the men’s Nordic skiing captain last year as a junior, ski teams began last year’s season with a new coaching staff and a variety of student experiences due to COVID — including first-graders who had never competed at the college level , athletes returning from gap years and those who had remained on campus during the pandemic.

But Jampel said the ski teams have found their rhythm in last spring’s NESCAC-sanctioned coach-led drills and optional preseason practice this fall ahead of their Oct. 5 start, which marked the start of traditional drills for this season .

“We started fresh – we used last year’s loose guidelines as a rebuild year and I feel like we’re really on the right track this year,” Jampel said. “We have stronger trust and a stronger communication pipeline between coaches, captains and athletes.”

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Southeastern Hosts Kinesiology Professional Development Day | events https://sentosoft.com/southeastern-hosts-kinesiology-professional-development-day-events/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 17:59:00 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/southeastern-hosts-kinesiology-professional-development-day-events/ Hammond- The Department of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Southeastern Louisiana University is hosting a professional development day for students on November 1 in the fraternity ballroom on the Southeastern campus. Titled “ASK KHS,” the symposium begins at 9:30 am and is open to all current students, alumni, faculty and staff. SLU photo “ASK KHS […]]]>

Hammond- The Department of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Southeastern Louisiana University is hosting a professional development day for students on November 1 in the fraternity ballroom on the Southeastern campus. Titled “ASK KHS,” the symposium begins at 9:30 am and is open to all current students, alumni, faculty and staff.









“ASK KHS is a day-long event featuring presentations from professionals working in careers related to our programs, as well as an internship fair,” said Charity Bryan, department head of kinesiology and health studies. “The sessions cover a variety of topics in the fields of health sciences, sports medicine, fitness, sports management, athletic training, and sports training and coaching.”

University of Tennessee Athletic Director Emeritus Joan Cronan is the keynote speaker at the symposium. She will present “You, Too Can Win a National Championship” at 9:30 am in the Fraternity Theater. Cronan grew up in Opelousas and is a national athletics legend. She was named a Title IX Trailblazer for the SEC just earlier this year.

Following Cronan’s presentation, breakout sessions are scheduled in the fraternity ballroom at 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m., beginning with former LSU gymnastics coach DD Breaux.

Kinesiology professor and founder of ASK KHS Eddie Hebert said attendees at the symposium could meet old friends and network with professionals attending the internship fair.

“There is no registration process or fee, just come to the Southeastern Student Union and join us for a great day of speakers and presentations,” he said.

For more information, contact the Department of Kinesiology and Health Studies at 985-549-2129.

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SPORTS FEVER – October 20, 2022 https://sentosoft.com/sports-fever-october-20-2022/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:59:03 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/sports-fever-october-20-2022/ SPORTS FEEVER – Written by Chris Fee (chrisjfee@yahoo.com) UMC baseball received verbal acceptance from Roseau’s Aaron Wensloff. YES Coach Steve Gust is trying to reach every Wensloff in Roseau!!! Joking aside, he’s getting a player that fits his program perfectly. A kid who is skilled in all facets of the game, works hard, loves baseball […]]]>

SPORTS FEEVER – Written by Chris Fee (chrisjfee@yahoo.com)

UMC baseball received verbal acceptance from Roseau’s Aaron Wensloff. YES Coach Steve Gust is trying to reach every Wensloff in Roseau!!! Joking aside, he’s getting a player that fits his program perfectly. A kid who is skilled in all facets of the game, works hard, loves baseball and is another local kid who should be doing great things at UMC.

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We have published the Crookston Pirate winter sports team fixtures on our website. Click on the link below to go to the page. Schedules are likely to change more than once for a number of reasons, including winter storms.

CROOKSTON PIRATE WINTER SPORTS SCHEDULES

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We’ve updated the latest Minnesota State High School fall sports polls with soccer, volleyball and soccer, all. Tennis hasn’t been updated for several weeks so we’ve sent an email and hopefully will have something new on Thursday.

CLICK HERE to see the latest polls.

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For the District 9 North 9 Man Soccer statistics CLICK HERE.

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For the 11-man football in the Northwest District statistics CLICK HERE.

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That Minnesota Wild announced today that it will be hosting Ice hockey weekend for girlsPresented by Red Baron® Pizza and in conjunction with Minnesota Hockey and the WCHA, May 17-18 December at the Xcel Energy Center.

The Wild will dedicate several elements of its game to celebrating girls’ and women’s hockey when it hosts the Ottawa Senators on Sunday, December 18 at 1:00 p.m. Girls’ and women’s hockey players will participate in various in-game and intermission activities, including the “Let’s play hockey!” call. Proceeds from the December 18 Split the Pot raffle will benefit the Women’s Hockey Association of Minnesota (WHAM).

The Wild is hosting dry land training sessions and on-ice clinics for 6U, 8U, 10U and 12U women hockey players at the Xcel Energy Center on December 17th. Minnesota Hockey staff and WCHA players will help run the clinics.

Registration for the Girls’ Hockey Clinics will open on Wednesday, November 2nd at 10am https://www.nhl.com/wild/community/girls-hockey-weekend. In addition to training sessions on ice and dry land, the $89 registration fee includes a Wild-branded jersey, a post-clinic pizza party featuring Red Baron® pizza, and a ticket to the Wild game on Sunday, April 18. December against the Ottawa Senators. Girls Hockey Clinics attendees will also receive an exclusive ticket offer for the additional ticket purchase for the December 18 game.

The 6U and 8U On-Ice Clinics will be held on Saturday, December 17th at 11:00am and 12:15pm (60 girls in each session). This is followed by the 10U and 12U on- and off-ice sessions. The 10U girls (50 girls) will be on the ice from 1:30pm to 2:30pm, followed by dry land practice from 2:45pm to 3:30pm. The 12U girls (50 girls) have dry land practice from 2:45-3:30 p.m. 1:30-2:15 p.m. followed by a session on the ice from 2:45-3:45 p.m

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Crookston Park and Rec Registration for fall and winter activities is now open. To see what the city has to offer, click here.

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JOKE

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How are ex-Crookston Pirates athletes doing in college or elsewhere?
****LET ME KNOW OTHERS THAT SHOULD ADD TO THE LIST. Email me at chrisjfee@yahoo.com

Jacey Larson is a freshman who plays hockey at Dakota College in Bottineau

Olivia Huck is a freshman playing soccer at Minnesota State Moorhead.

Brook’s butt is a freshman who plays football at the University of Jamestown.

Aleah Bienek is a freshman who plays hockey at Trine University in Indiana.

Elise Tangquist is this year’s assistant girls’ volleyball and assistant girls’ golf coach at Heritage Christian Academy in Maple Grove.

Emma Borowicz is a second running track in the state of Minnesota in Mankato.

Kaleb Thingelstad is a sophomore and plays golf at North Central University in the Twin Cities.

Joslyn Leach is a sophomore golfer at Concordia College, Moorhead. The Cobbers finished the fall season.

Brady Butt is a junior who plays football at the University of Jamestown.

Rachel Hefta is a senior and plays volleyball at Hastings College in Nebraska.

Ty Hamre plays football at Bemidji State University.

Paul Bitter plays professional ice hockey in Norway.

Kate MacGregor is senior swimming at Minnesota State Moorhead.

Alece Durbin is a junior on the University of North Dakota women’s track and field team.

Nick Garmen is a junior who plays tennis at the University of Minnesota Morris.

Elizabeth Erdman is the coach of the Moorhead Red Dragon swim team.

Crookston School District Coach –
Emil Meyer
is the hockey coach and assistant softball coach for the Pirate Head Girls.
Lacia Hanson is the junior high softball coach.
Jeremy Lubinski
is an 8th grade pirate soccer coach.
Amy Boll
is the head coach of Pirate Girls Track
Sarah Reese
is the Pirate Head Girls Soccer Coach
Cody Brekken
is the Crookston Community Pool Supervisor
Marley Melbye is the Head Girls swim coach
Rock Hanson
is a volunteer assistant coach at Pirate Baseball.
Ben Halos is an assistant coach at Pirate Baseball.
Alex LaFrance
is a volunteer assistant coach at Pirate Baseball.
Jeff Perault
is the head coach of Pirate Girls Golf
Wes Hanson is the Pirate Wrestling Head Coach and Assistant Boys Golf Coach
Kevin Weber is a volunteer assistant coach at Pirate Boys Basketball
Connor Morgan is the assistant coach of the Pirate Boys Hockey
Sam Melbye is the coach of Pirate Boys JV Hockey
Chris Dufault is youth wrestling coach
Colton Weiland is an assistant wrestling coach

Coaching outside of Crookston High School –

Collin Reynolds is the head baseball coach for the University of Colorado Buffalo Club baseball team.

Trento Stahlecker is a school safety specialist working for Brevard Public Schools, Florida

Cody Weiland is an assistant wrestling coach at Proctor/Hermantown

Josh Edlund is a head football coach and physical education teacher based in Flandreau, South Dakota.

Allison Lindsey Axness is Assistant Varsity Volleyball Coach at Champlin Park

Jeff Olson is head wrestling coach and head baseball coach at Delano.

Jake Olson is Assistant Football Coach and Head Boys Tennis Coach at Delano.

Katy Westrom is Head Girls Tennis Coach and Head Boys Tennis Coach at Monticello High School.

Matt Harris is the Assistant Principal/Physical Director at Saguaro High School in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Martin Bratrud is Superintendent and Principal at Westhope High School.

Gordie Haug is an assistant football coach at the University of Wyoming.

Mike Hastings is the head hockey coach of the Minnesota State Mankato Men’s.

Mike Biermaier is the athletic director of Grand Forks Schools.

Stephanie (Lindsay) Perreault works with the North Dakota state statistics crew for bison football, volleyball and basketball during the winter. Stephanie’s husband, Ryan, is Bison’s associate director of media relations

Jason Bushie is a hockey coach at Colorado College

Chris Myrold is a Director and Fitness at Mission Ranch and Fitness in Camel, California.

Kyle Buchmeier
is a tennis pro at the Reed-Sweatt Family Tennis Center in Minneapolis

Ben Andringa serves our country with the army and is deployed to Iraq for nine months.

Jarret Butenhoff serves our country with the US Navy.

Joshua Butenhoff serves our country on a US Navy Pacific Fleet submarine.

Peter Cournia is a 2002 graduate of Crookston High School and a graduate of West Point and is currently serving in the US Army.

Eric Ellingson serves our country with the US Air Force in Minot.

Philip Kujawa, Class of 2004, from Crookston High School. He’s an Army recruiter in Rochester.

Rob Sobolik is the CEO of the Fargodome

That’s it for this week. Thank you for the comments, and if you have anything to add or share, please email or call chrisjfee@yahoo.com. Thanks for reading and listening KROX RADIO and kroxam.com.

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