Athletic Training – Sento Soft http://sentosoft.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:41:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sentosoft.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Athletic Training – Sento Soft http://sentosoft.com/ 32 32 Coach Masa Shoji, the “heart and soul” of Norwalk Athletics, bids farewell https://sentosoft.com/coach-masa-shoji-the-heart-and-soul-of-norwalk-athletics-bids-farewell/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:41:01 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/coach-masa-shoji-the-heart-and-soul-of-norwalk-athletics-bids-farewell/ Eleven years were definitely not planned. When Masayoshi Shoji joined Norwalk High as a physical education coach in 2011, his course was to “stay for a few years” before returning to grad school. Those plans have certainly changed. “The few years turned into eleven,” Shoji said. “The main reason I stayed was because of the […]]]>

Eleven years were definitely not planned.

When Masayoshi Shoji joined Norwalk High as a physical education coach in 2011, his course was to “stay for a few years” before returning to grad school.

Those plans have certainly changed.

“The few years turned into eleven,” Shoji said. “The main reason I stayed was because of the people I met at Norwalk High. The community, the people and the kids – I just made a connection.”

Now the time has finally come for a change as Shoji said he is moving back to Japan where his family lives and will try to start a new chapter in his life.

A tweet from Norwalk sporting director Doug Marchetti’s Twitter account announced Shgoji’s departure earlier this month and the response was overwhelming.

From Norwalk Baseball: “Proud to call (Masa Shoji) a friend, colleague and fellow bear. His dedication and love for the student athletes and coaches within NHS Athletics has been unwavering across THOUSANDS of games/fights/matches and THOUSANDS of hours in his training room.”

From Norwalk Girls Lacrosse: “There aren’t enough thank you’s that could truly express our gratitude for (Masa Shoji). The backbone of all our sports programs.”

“For me, Masa was the heart and soul of our athletic department during my time as athletic director and during his 11 years at Norwalk High School,” Marchetti said. “He is so much more than a sports coach. I tease him all the time. I tell him: “You wear so many hats. You are a psychologist, consultant, sports trainer.

“The kids just have so much respect for him and it reflects the respect he has for them and the work he does with them.”

Shoji, who was born in Detroit, said he had a love for sports from a young age. His parents were born in Japan, where Shoji attended middle and high school after his father’s job required the family to relocate.

He played basketball in high school and on Japan sports teams throughout the school year.

“In Japan, we only play one sport for school and we play all year round,” Shoji said. “I like how things are going here. They have a regular season – 20 games for basketball, soccer, 15 or 16 games for soccer – that’s set in such a way that you have something to look forward to. In Japan, all tournaments were official games, so if you lose, you’re done.”

Shoji said he was injured multiple times and as he went through the process of getting back into action, the connection with sports training “clicked”.

“I love playing and watching sports, and on the other hand I also had an interest in helping other people,” he said.

He was able to work for and learn from a chiropractor while in school and had an older friend who became a trainer and helped advance his course. He studied Athletic Training at Stony Brook University and joined the Innovative Health and Rehabilitation Clinic in Norwalk in 2011 and then Norwalk High.

As he made connections at Norwalk over the years, Shoji said the most important thing when dealing with children is to listen.

“The biggest thing for me was listening to what they were saying, processing the information and seeing if I could understand and relate to it,” Shoji said. “That worked.”

“He always gave everything and was always there for our children,” said Marchetti. “When he had to work overtime, he did so on behalf of the children and that was greatly appreciated.”

While wearing the coaching cap, Shoji quickly became a huge Bears fan and was often asked by athletes which teams he liked to watch the most.

“I used to tell them ‘Whoever tries,'” Shoji said. “Whoever doesn’t give up and gives everything on the field, on the pitch or wherever, that’s my favorite team. That has always been my answer and that lever is changing.”

Shoji credited Marchetti with his support.

“It comes from the top with Mr. Marchetti,” Shoji said. “His support was always there and it made my job and duties as an athletic coach run smoothly.”

By the fall, someone new will have taken over the position of athletic trainer at Norwalk, and the relationship-building process will begin anew.

“These relationships don’t happen overnight, they don’t happen automatically,” Marchetti said. “So it’s going to take a little time for a new person to settle in and build those relationships and those trusts. I am confident that we will bring the right person up front.

“But to replace Masa? We’re going to have a new athletic coach, I don’t know if we’ll ever replace Masa in terms of what he means to our kids and our program.”

david.stewart@hearstmediat.com; @dstewartsports

]]>
Adia Barnes stocks one of the best frontcourts in the nation with Cunningham’s involvement https://sentosoft.com/adia-barnes-stocks-one-of-the-best-frontcourts-in-the-nation-with-cunninghams-involvement/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 23:01:09 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/adia-barnes-stocks-one-of-the-best-frontcourts-in-the-nation-with-cunninghams-involvement/ SBLive graphics A key game that fueled Arizona’s rise to a nationally recognized program was the Wildcats’ 83-54 home loss to Oregon in the 2018-19 season. The Ducks clinched at least part of the Pac-12 title that day, March 1, 2019, by beating Arizona 19-0 — yes, 19-0 — in the fourth quarter en route […]]]>
SBLive graphics

A key game that fueled Arizona’s rise to a nationally recognized program was the Wildcats’ 83-54 home loss to Oregon in the 2018-19 season.

The Ducks clinched at least part of the Pac-12 title that day, March 1, 2019, by beating Arizona 19-0 — yes, 19-0 — in the fourth quarter en route to victory at McKale Center .

Oregon’s Postal Player Satou Sabally and Ruthy Hebard (both 6-foot-4) were unstoppable on offense and effectively shut down Ari McDonald off the track with their size and athleticism. Sabally and Hebard combined for 32 points on 15 of 22 shots from the field and 19 rebounds in the game.

The presence of Sabally and Hebard eased the offensive flow for Sabrina Ionescu Having 22 points in 6-of-9 shooting from 3-point range.

“We’re not there as a team, as a culture, as a program, but we will be.” Adia Barnes said after this loss. “It just shows you where we need to be and what level we need to play at.”

Barnes has Arizona at this level, not only because of the magical run to the Final Four in 2021, but also with their hiring of top-class inside players over the past two years.

The commitment of 6-4 five-star post players Breya Cunningham of La Jolla (California) Today’s Country Day is Arizona’s latest development with one of the best frontcourts in the nation. She hails from the San Diego area where Barnes played in high school.

Cunningham is ranked #10 in the Class of 2023 according to ESPN’s HoopGurlz Recruiting Rankings.

Montaya dewa 6-2 forward from Las Vegas Centennial High School, is ranked No. 9. She signed for Barnes and Arizona last December.

Dew and Cunningham are set to be on the same roster as 6-4 next year Maya Nnaji and 6-5 post players Lauren Ware in one of the most impressive frontcourts in the country.

UCLA, USC, Oregon and Texas were the other finalists in the running for Cunningham, who is quite athletic, especially for her size. She plans to study athletic training and kinesology in Arizona.

Cunningham’s first sport was gymnastics when she was 4 years old. Her mother turned her to basketball after realizing that very tall gymnasts were not common.

“I can still do a mean cart, though,” Cunningham told the San Diego Union-Tribune in a January article.

Cunningham was dominant in the San Diego Section championship game that season against Mission Hills, finishing with 25 points on 12-of-14 shots from the field and 13 rebounds despite facing doubles and triples teams.

In three collegiate seasons, Cunningham has 1,335 points, 872 rebounds, 173 blocks and 104 steals.

“I chose the school (Arizona) based on four things – education, development on and off the field, support and NIL opportunities,” Cunningham said in a video she posted to Twitter on Sunday. “Tucson, I’m coming home.”

The video shows Cunningham briefing Arizona’s coaches and players on her signing during her official visit last weekend. They all celebrated with confetti in the air and balloons.

From that scoreless fourth quarter against Oregon to now, Arizona has literally gone through a major transformation.

FOLLOW @JAVIERJMORALES ON TWITTER!

Javier Morales, Publisher, Writer and Editor of ALLSPORTSTUCSON.com, is a past Arizona Press Club honoree. He is a former Arizona Daily Star beat reporter for the Arizona basketball team, including when the Wildcats won the 1996-97 NCAA title. He has written articles for CollegeAD.com, Bleacher Report, Lindy’s Sports, TucsonCitizen.com, The Arizona Republic, Sporting News, and Baseball America, among many other publications. He is also the author of the book The Highest Form of Living, available on Amazon. He became an educator five years ago and is currently a special education teacher at Gallego Fine Arts Intermediate in the Sunnyside Unified School District.

Print friendly, PDF & email

]]>
For the record, June 22, 2022 https://sentosoft.com/for-the-record-june-22-2022/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 17:01:55 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/for-the-record-june-22-2022/ For the Record provides information on the recent professional activities and honors of the University of Delaware’s faculty, staff, students and alumni. Recent presentations, appointments and honors include: presentations graduate Michael A Silverman, Chair of the Emergency Department at Virginia Hospital Center and Director of the Leadership Academy of Emergency Medicine Associates, served as a […]]]>

For the Record provides information on the recent professional activities and honors of the University of Delaware’s faculty, staff, students and alumni.

Recent presentations, appointments and honors include:

presentations

graduate Michael A Silverman, Chair of the Emergency Department at Virginia Hospital Center and Director of the Leadership Academy of Emergency Medicine Associates, served as a virtual guest presenter for a class in the Department of Kinesiology and Applied Physiology. A practicing physician of nearly 30 years, Silverman received his residency in emergency medicine from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as Chief Resident and has authored a book and numerous textbook chapters throughout his career. For his presentation at the course, titled “Emergency Care of Sports Related Injuries and Illnesses,” Silverman highlighted the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic and what healthcare providers need to consider going forward. Since 2020, Silverman has built a large online following by creating posts to help viewers distinguish between truth and fiction for the future implications of healthcare. “I was very grateful to Silverman for bringing his insight into the importance of interprofessional collaboration to our first-year Master of Science Athletic Training students,” he said Jeff Schneider, Senior Instructor in Kinesiology and Applied Physiology. “He spoke about the importance of being an advocate for your profession and the importance of being a lifelong learner. These points resonated with our students. It’s always great when an outstanding medical practitioner speaks to our students, but it’s even better when it’s a UD alumnus.”

Events

Kimberly IsettJoseph R. Biden, Jr. School of Public Policy and Administration Associate Dean of Research and Director of the Master of Public Health in Health Policy and Management Program and Jessica E SowaProfessor at the Biden School, now serve as Editors-in-Chief of Perspectives on Public Management and Governance (PPMG). PPMG is the leading academic journal in public affairs and a publication of the Public Management Research Association. Isett and Sowa bring a wealth of research and editorial experience to their new roles and look forward to helping shape the future impact of public affairs research through their work at PPMG. More details can be found here.

honors

Debra Hess NorrisProfessor and Chair of the Board of Trustees and Faculty Committee on Honorary Degrees and Distinctions pam cook, Unidel Professor of Mathematical Sciences, Associate Dean of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering, Received the University of Delaware Medal of Distinction at the UD ADVANCE and UD Women’s Caucus on May 10. According to Norris, “The Medal of Distinction is awarded to a person who has made humanitarian, cultural, intellectual, or scientific contributions to society, or achieved notable achievement in his/her profession, or rendered significant service to the university, community, state, or region. She cited Cook’s many contributions during her 40-year career at UD, including her tenure as Chair of the Department of Mathematical Sciences and Associate Dean of Engineering, and her work as Principal Investigator on a multimillion NSF ADVANCE grant Dollar focused on recruiting and retaining an increasingly diverse pool of talented faculty for UD.​

Jane Case Lilly, Assistant Professor at the Joseph R. Biden, Jr. School of Public Policy and Administration, received the 2022 Honors College Teaching Award. This award recognizes Case Lilly’s commitment to teaching excellence and supporting their students. She has been involved in teaching leadership majors for more than 15 years and also teaches in the Public Policy and MPA programs. She earned her Ph.D. in Urban Affairs and Public Policy from the Biden School in 2008.

To submit information for inclusion in For the Record, write to ocm@udel.edu and include “For the Record” in the subject line.

]]>
Students Receive Awards for Athletic Endurance | Health https://sentosoft.com/students-receive-awards-for-athletic-endurance-health/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:47:00 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/students-receive-awards-for-athletic-endurance-health/ UPMC Sports Medicine recently recognized and celebrated student athletes from 20 partner school districts in the 2021-22 Champions Cup and Student Athletic Perseverance Awards. “Our team is honored to support student athletes, coaches and athletic programs in our local school districts. We pride ourselves on keeping all of our athletes safe on the field and […]]]>

UPMC Sports Medicine recently recognized and celebrated student athletes from 20 partner school districts in the 2021-22 Champions Cup and Student Athletic Perseverance Awards.

“Our team is honored to support student athletes, coaches and athletic programs in our local school districts. We pride ourselves on keeping all of our athletes safe on the field and helping them perform at a high level and to the best of their ability,” said Michael Ludwikowski, Manager, Outreach Athletic Training, UPMC in North Central Pa. “We are proud to serve our schools in the region. These awards give us a fun opportunity to recognize our participating schools and honor student-athletes who have persevered and overcome injuries. Congratulations to all schools and student-athletes for their achievements this year.”

This year’s Champions Cup winners were Williamsport High School (Large Division) and South Williamsport High School (Small Division).

Student Athlete Perseverance Awards were presented to athletes from participating schools who were selected by their certified athletic trainer for their commitment to healthy recovery and overcoming an injury to play again during the school year.

Student Athlete Perseverance Awards have been presented to several students including: Anton Stratts – Football, Wrestling and Athletics – Central Mountain High School; Brynn Fisher – tennis, basketball and softball – Montgomery Area High School, Chloe Burke – football and softball – Sullivan County High School; Grant Bachman – football, basketball and baseball – South Williamsport High School; Kassidy Beinlich – football, basketball and track and field – Sullivan County High School; Lauren Anderson – Football and Athletics – Muncy High School; Mikaella Posada – Basketball and Athletics – Wellsboro High School; Quintin Kertsmar – Wrestling – Warrior Run High School; Rocco Pulizzi – Football and Athletics – Montoursville Area High School; Sam Allison – Football, Basketball and Athletics – Williamsport Area High School and Sheiana Tutler – Tennis, Basketball and Softball – St. John Newman Regional Academy.

For more information on UPMC Sports Medicine Services available in north-central Pennsylvania, visit UPMC.com/SportsMedicineNCPA.

]]>
Ravens Stock Report: Who’s Up and Who’s Down as Offseason Program Ends? https://sentosoft.com/ravens-stock-report-whos-up-and-whos-down-as-offseason-program-ends/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:20:40 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/ravens-stock-report-whos-up-and-whos-down-as-offseason-program-ends/ All in all, it’s been a pretty productive post-draft stretch for the Ravens. They survived the rookie minicamp, organized team activities, and mandatory minicamp with no significant injuries and with positive reports of players returning from serious injuries. Their rookie class, led by safety Kyle Hamilton and center Tyler Linderbaum, looked as advertised. Lamar Jackson’s […]]]>

All in all, it’s been a pretty productive post-draft stretch for the Ravens.

They survived the rookie minicamp, organized team activities, and mandatory minicamp with no significant injuries and with positive reports of players returning from serious injuries. Their rookie class, led by safety Kyle Hamilton and center Tyler Linderbaum, looked as advertised. Lamar Jackson’s return to mandatory mini-camp last week gave a boost to the offensive and brought out the best in a question-shrouded reception group.

There is still a lot to do for the team officials before the players report for the training camp in about five weeks. But now they know exactly where things are going deep and where more help is needed. And the members of the 90-man squad should also know exactly where they stand.

When there’s a quiet period on the NFL calendar, the Ravens are there. It seems like a good time to take stock of whose status is up and whose status is down.

topping up

Mark Andrews, TE: Andrews’ standing with the Ravens probably couldn’t be higher after he had an All-Pro season last year and established himself as a top tight end. However, he still deserves a mention here simply for tackling the various off-season practices at a time when it would have been entirely understandable if he had stayed at home or cycled through practice. Andrews was one of the most active and hard working players on the field. Whenever the Ravens started fighting offensively during last week’s minicamp, Jackson found Andrews and the defense couldn’t do anything about it.

Athletic training/strength and conditioning bars: After last year’s injury-plagued campaign, so much attention is being paid to the Ravens’ collective health and their ability to avoid injury. So far, so good. The Ravens had a fair amount of absenteeism throughout the various offseason practices, but almost all of the health-related absentees came from guys who were still in rehab after suffering serious injuries during the 2021 season. If the most significant injury sustained during OTAs and mandatory minicamp was an ankle sprain, that’s good news. There’s still a long way to go, but after last year, when it seemed like every practice session was going down, every injury-free stretch should be celebrated by the Ravens.

Tyler Badie, RB: With JK Dobbins and Gus Edwards sidelined while they rehab their knee injuries, the sixth-round rookie continues to get plenty of chances and he’s making the most of them. He was particularly effective as a receiver outside the backfield. When he has chances to run the ball, he has shown a good shot and sight. Between Badie and veteran Mike Davis, who was also impressive, the Ravens have done a good job this offseason bringing quality depth to the backfield.


Tyler Badie (Scott Taetsch/USA Today)

Jaylon Ferguson, OLB: Ferguson looks like a completely different player from his first three seasons. This is mainly because he lost a lot of weight and changed his body. That helped him play with a little more speed and aggression. Before Ferguson sprained his ankle last week, he showed a lot of improvement. He’s already a solid running defender. If he can get more juice out of the edge as a pass rusher, he’ll get plenty of snaps in 2022.

Daelin Hayes, OLB: Just like last year, Hayes was one of the most noticeable and effective players on the field during offseason practice. He looked explosive and put up a nice series of moves off the edge, which proved a constant challenge for the Ravens’ offensive tackles. Hayes couldn’t stay healthy last year, playing all four snaps of the regular season. If he can break out and become a threat this year, it would be a significant development for the Ravens.

Tony Jefferson, S. Jefferson’s career seemed almost over last year when he returned to Baltimore and injected some energy into an injury-depleted defense. Jefferson re-signed early in the offseason and the Ravens added a number of other quality defensemen. Jefferson is perceived as the “bubble guy” entering camp, but he was in fine form at last week’s minicamp with two interceptions. In a defense with a number of newcomers and youngsters, it shouldn’t be too hard to find a spot for Jefferson who brings leadership and personality.

Isaiah probably, TE: Probably one of the stories from last week’s minicamp became a series of one-handed catches and touchdowns in Thursday’s final practice session. He was also very noticeable during the OTAs and seemed to snap a few catches every practice. The fourth-round pick from Coastal Carolina already has a fan in Jackson. Much has been said and written about the team’s lack of depth at wide receivers, but Likely is versatile enough to help in that area.

James Proche, WR: Not only that, Proche seems to be making a few hard catches in every practice session. He did that last year too, and he came in sporadically on Sundays. It’s more the tenacity, consistency and work ethic that he brings to the field every day. Proche dropped a long pass on Day 2 of last week’s minicamp. Blaming himself, he caught just about everything that got his way in the last day and a half of training. He also seems to be fast becoming the leader of a young recording group.

Damarion Williams, CB: The rookie quarter-round corner makes a strong first impression. Defensive passing coordinator Chris Hewitt, a no-nonsense coach who isn’t easily impressed, was effusive last week when asked about the former Houston standout. Williams has been on the ball a lot during training and plays with energy and pride. He’s shown enough to suggest that as a rookie he could play a role on both defensive and special teams.

stock down

Ben Cleveland, G: Cleveland was expected to get a legitimate shot to win the starting left guard job this summer, and that’s how it could still play out. If last week’s minicamp was any indication, Cleveland has some catching up to do. The Ravens moved around their offensive linemen throughout offseason practice, but Cleveland didn’t get the same opportunities down the left flank as Tire Phillips and Ben Powers did. This is big training camp for the 2021 third-round pick, who needs to train better and avoid issues that take him off the field.

Daniel Fälele, OT: The next month will be crucial for Faalele to be in the best possible shape for the training camp. The 6-foot-8, 380-pound rookie battled the heat in both OTAs and minicamp. Spending a lot of time on one or two knees, he caught the attention of athletic training staff last week. Coach John Harbaugh defended the fourth-round pick, saying Faalele is a “good weight” and learning how to play at the NFL level. Nevertheless, it was clear in the last month that Faalele has a lot to do.


Daniel Faalele (Scott Taetsch/USA Today)

Malik Harrison, ILB: It’s not like Harrison did anything wrong, was out of shape, or noticeably struggled. None of that happened. He just hasn’t done much to stand out, and the Ravens need the third-year linebacker to make a meaningful move forward. The Ravens know what Harrison can do on special teams, but they’re thin at inside linebackers and Harrison is one play away from starting. There was talk of Harrison cross-training as an outside linebacker, but there was no evidence of this during drills open to the media. Harrison needs to make a name for himself on the inside.

Justice Hill, RB: Again, this has nothing to do with the form Hill has shown since the OTAs. He should be commended for recovering from an Achilles tendon injury and being on the field as early as possible. He also looks almost 100 percent. It all has to do with Badie and Davis’ performances over the past month and the reality that Hill, the 2019 fourth-round pick, needs to have a strong preseason to make the team.

Michael Pierce, DT: Let’s be clear: This isn’t a criticism of Pierce, who hasn’t appeared on OTAs and has been a mandatory mini-camp for what Harbaugh called a “personal matter.” Pierce deserves the benefit of the doubt and team officials appear confident the 29-year-old will have it all behind him by the time training camp begins, whatever the issue. Still, it was a shame for the team that they didn’t have their free-agent acquisition on the field throughout the offseason. Pierce has only played eight games in the past two years and has had weight issues in the past. His condition will be examined in the training camp.

Undrafted Rookie Free Agent Wide Receiver: That’s a little unfair because the Ravens’ six rookie free-agent pass catchers are still learning the offense. It’s not like Raleigh Webb (The Citadel), Devon Williams (Oregon), Makai Polk (Mississippi State), Slade Bolden (Alabama), Shemar Bridges (Fort Valley State) and Trevon Clark (Cal) have high expectations. However, it’s hard to overlook the opportunity they have. There is at least one opening for a rookie receiver, and none of them have consistently stood out. Williams probably made the most plays, but the six rookie free agents will need to flash more regularly to get into the 53-man mix.

Ar’Darius Washington, DB: Washington is returning from a serious foot injury that ended his rookie season last November, leaving him without an opportunity to start with his 53-man roster. It’s not his fault, but the Ravens are loaded in the defensive backfield and Washington won’t have much time to impress. His best role may be in the Nickels, and the Ravens are well-endowed there. You are even more secure.

(Top photo by Mark Andrews: Tommy Gilligan / USA Today)

]]>
2022 Workers’ Comp Power Broker Steve Love shares insights into Insurtech and what makes brokerage a great career: Risk & Insurance https://sentosoft.com/2022-workers-comp-power-broker-steve-love-shares-insights-into-insurtech-and-what-makes-brokerage-a-great-career-risk-insurance/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 13:31:08 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/2022-workers-comp-power-broker-steve-love-shares-insights-into-insurtech-and-what-makes-brokerage-a-great-career-risk-insurance/ One of the knock-on effects of the pandemic is the way it has accelerated many trends that have just taken hold in the world of work, such as telemedicine and a greater emphasis on worker mental health and well-being. Brokers have had to pivot and adapt quickly to provide clients with the right solutions at […]]]>

One of the knock-on effects of the pandemic is the way it has accelerated many trends that have just taken hold in the world of work, such as telemedicine and a greater emphasis on worker mental health and well-being. Brokers have had to pivot and adapt quickly to provide clients with the right solutions at the right time…

One of the knock-on effects of the pandemic is the way it has accelerated many trends that have just taken hold in the world of work, such as telemedicine and a greater emphasis on worker mental health and well-being.

Brokers have had to pivot and adapt quickly to provide clients with the right solutions at the right time. Steve Love, CEO, SolePro, is among six brokers recognized as 2022 Workers’ Compensation Power Brokers for their achievements in guiding clients through the new landscape.

Risk & Insurance® spoke to Love about his journey through the industry, the impact of the pandemic and the birth of his company, SolePro.

Risk & Insurance: What drew you to a career in brokerage?

steve love I studied psychology in school and decided it wasn’t for me.

My father worked in the management of a large insurance company. I knew a lot of people in the industry and they all looked like they were going to be successful, so I said, “I can do this!”

R&I: What are the biggest differences in how customers are approaching their worker compensation programs since the pandemic began?

SL: The problem of work from home is the biggest problem and related precautions for the people who come to the office.

R&I: Can you tell us something about SolePro? What was the emergence of this Insurtech platform for clients, what does it do and how has it helped clients since its inception?

SL: SolePro — it’s a fantastic solution to a big problem of writing compensation for small workers. It’s simple and very effective.

SoleX is a minimum premium policy coupled with a 24 hour accident insurance policy. It’s instant coverage with no waiting, no mid-exams, no AR carrier switching — and all online. We can instantly translate into any language.

Solo I is owner-managed. It’s the same quick and easy online process that policyholders can do on their phones.

Plus is regular workers’ compensation insurance [policy] for employers with employees in 43 states.

R&I: Who do you think were some of your greatest mentors and why?

SL: I’ve had many mentors, but an old friend in the industry once told me two things that I will never forget that helped me so much.

First, learn how to say “no.” Understand that you cannot do everything for everyone.

Second, do the worst things first – do the worst things you have to do that day first, then it’s over and you don’t have to think about it anymore. Good advice.

R&I: What work achievement are you particularly proud of?

SL: The job achievement I’m most proud of? Easy. That many of my employees have been with me for 10, 15 and 20 years!

I couldn’t have achieved much without her.

R&I: What advice would you give to young professionals entering the workers’ compensation brokerage industry?

SL: My advice to young professionals entering the workers’ compensation recruitment industry – come on!

It’s a great industry and we need young people.

You can work in any segment you want. If you enjoy fishing or hunting, specialize in these programs. Build relationships and have fun. The longer you stay, the better it gets! &


Read more about the 2022 Workers’ Compensation Power Broker winners and their techniques, interests and brokerage skills in Risk & Insurance‘s Q&A series.

Autumn Demberger is a content strategist at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]

]]>
LHU student interns at Mansfield University and UPMC Cole | News, Sports, Jobs https://sentosoft.com/lhu-student-interns-at-mansfield-university-and-upmc-cole-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 05:53:29 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/lhu-student-interns-at-mansfield-university-and-upmc-cole-news-sports-jobs/ (Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories written by Lock Haven University graduates about their full-immersion athletic training internship ahead of graduation this spring.) In the final semester of the Master of Science in Athletic Training program at Lock Haven University (LHU), each student completes an extensive internship at a […]]]>

(Editor’s note: This is part of a series of stories written by Lock Haven University graduates about their full-immersion athletic training internship ahead of graduation this spring.)

In the final semester of the Master of Science in Athletic Training program at Lock Haven University (LHU), each student completes an extensive internship at a location of their choice. Kasey Creech of Galeton chose to return to her hometown to complete her internship at two locations: Mansfield University (MU) under the guidance of LHU grads Brian Oakes ’94 and ’14 MS, LAT, ATC and Kayla Wright. 20 MS, LAT, ATC and at UPMC Cole under the supervision of Melissa O’Brien, LAT, ATC.

Creech secured an athletic training position with UPMC Cole upon graduation this spring and saw her internship as an opportunity to begin the transition to athletic training in a more rural setting than she experienced in her clinical rotations during her high school days at LHU.

The first half of the 2022 spring semester was spent in Mansfield working primarily with the men’s and women’s basketball teams, but also working with spring preseason athletes and even some fall athletes. MU was a good transition to working in a more rural setting, overcoming the challenges of accessing healthcare in rural areas, but also using the college experiences gained while completing clinical studies at LHU.

The team doctor for MU came to the campus every week to get any referrals from the athletic trainers. work together on a regular basis to provide athletes with the best care. Many discussions between the team doctor, MU sports administration and sports coaches took place during the creation of new COVID-19 protocols for the return to the game and the consideration of the introduction of new mental health screening technology.

Creech had the opportunity to participate in these discussions and share insights into this new screening technology that was introduced to her during her time at LHU. She was welcomed with open arms by her teachers, Oakes and Wright, and they were able to share their similar experiences of completing the physical education program at LHU.

UPMC Cole has many contracts with high schools in the surrounding areas to provide athletic training services to both junior high and college students. O’Brien is currently providing services to three local high schools in Potter, McKean and Cameron counties because of the continuing need for athletic trainers in this rural area of ​​Pennsylvania.

During the second half of the semester, Creech completed most of her clinical hours at Smethport Area Jr./Sr. High School but also gained experience with athletes at other schools including Coudersport Area JSHS, Cameron County JSHS, Northern Potter JSHS and Galeton JSHS.

Building relationships with athletic directors, coaches, athletes and other athletic trainers at various schools in this field will prove very helpful in the transition to their role at UPMC. Working with junior high and high school athletes instead of collegiate athletes has proven to be quite a mindset shift. In high school, there are many teaching moments, e.g. For example, how and what to stretch, how to properly warm up to prevent injury, pain versus pain, and even distinguishing growing pains from injury pain. That’s not to say these things aren’t present at the college level, just a small fraction of the other injuries seen in that setting.

“I was able to gain more hands-on experience during my time at both stations, which was difficult at LHU due to COVID-19 restrictions,” said Krech. “I was able to apply the knowledge I gained while studying at LHU to work with billing, inventory, documentation, risk management and the referral process, as well as practical skills including assessment/diagnostics, treatment plans, immediate and emergency care.”

Overall, Creech has loved meeting and collaborating with each new admin, coach, athlete, and athletic trainer and gaining insights that come with each new interaction. She looks forward to bringing all of her experience gained during clinical rotations and coursework at LHU to UPMC Cole in Coudersport.



Today’s breaking news and more in your inbox









]]>
Fred McAfee and Devery Henderson become the newest inductees of the Saints Hall of Fame https://sentosoft.com/fred-mcafee-and-devery-henderson-become-the-newest-inductees-of-the-saints-hall-of-fame/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 21:27:29 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/fred-mcafee-and-devery-henderson-become-the-newest-inductees-of-the-saints-hall-of-fame/ “Almost Freddie” can now say he ran into the Saints Hall of Fame. Fred McAfee, who completed 10 seasons as a running back for the Saints in two stints, joins receiver Devery Henderson to form this year’s induction class, which was announced Thursday. Longtime assistant athletic coach Kevin Mangum received the Joe Gemelli Fleur de […]]]>

“Almost Freddie” can now say he ran into the Saints Hall of Fame.

Fred McAfee, who completed 10 seasons as a running back for the Saints in two stints, joins receiver Devery Henderson to form this year’s induction class, which was announced Thursday. Longtime assistant athletic coach Kevin Mangum received the Joe Gemelli Fleur de Lis award for his contributions to the Saints organization.

“I think the biggest thing about all three is that they’re great people and they really care about the people of this organization,” said Saints coach Dennis Allen. “And they’ve represented this organization in many different ways and in many different facets, as have (later owner) Tom Benson, (current owner) Mrs. (Gayle) Benson, (executive vice president/general manager) Mickey (Loomis) , (Saints President) Dennis (Lauscha), wants our organization to be represented.”

McAfee played for the Saints from 1991–93 and 2000–06 after being drafted sixth round (154th overall) by Mississippi College in 1991. He excelled on special teams and finished his career with 210 special teams tackles, including 115 during his second Saints stint. That ranked fourth in the NFL during that span. As a Saint, he also had two forced fumbles and five fumble recoveries on cover units.

In 2002, he was a Pro Bowl selection. McAfee played for three of the team‘s division champion teams and was affiliated with the team for all nine, including the 2009 Super Bowl XLIV championship season. He played 194 games during his 15-year career, including 122 with New Orleans. During his career, McAfee had 304 carries for 1,272 yards and eight touchdowns, caught 35 passes for 211 yards, and returned 119 kicks for 2,422 yards.

McAfee has been involved in player development at the club since retiring in 2006 and is now entering his second season as Vice President/Player Engagement.

]]>
college news https://sentosoft.com/college-news/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 20:42:55 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/college-news/ • Red Bud’s Megan Thompson recently received the University Contributor Award from Southeast Missouri State University at Cape Girardeau. This award is given to students, faculty members and staff who have made significant contributions to the university. Thompson is a senior interior designer, majoring in architectural design and theater as minors. • Red Bud’s Maria […]]]>

• Red Bud’s Megan Thompson recently received the University Contributor Award from Southeast Missouri State University at Cape Girardeau. This award is given to students, faculty members and staff who have made significant contributions to the university. Thompson is a senior interior designer, majoring in architectural design and theater as minors.

• Red Bud’s Maria Mueller was added to the list of deans for the spring 2022 semester at Rockhurst University in Kansas City, Missouri.

• Lauren Welge was inducted into the University of Mississippi’s Spring 2022 Chancellor’s Roll of Honor. Welge is majoring in Allied Health Studies.

• Prairie Du Roche’s Audrey Wuertz was added to the dean list for the Spring 2022 semester at the University of Evansville, Indiana. Würtz is studying athletics.

• Ava’s Karrington Bethany Lacy was named to the Academic Dean’s Roll of Honor for the Spring 2022 semester at Mars Hill University in North Carolina.

• Red Bud’s Evan McCarthy graduated on Saturday, May 14 with a Bachelor of Arts in Biology from Blackburn College in Carlinville.

The following students recently graduated from Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville:

• Nathan Parkinson of Coulterville, BS, Electrical Engineering

• Isaac Luthy from Evansville, BS, History

• Erin Hewitt of Red Bud, BS, Criminal Justice Studies

• Courtney Maisel of Red Bud, MS, Speech Pathology

• Chris Miesner of Red Bud, EDS, Education Administration

• Colin Neumeyer of Red Bud, PB, Teaching English as a Second Language

• Emily Posth of Red Bud, MS, Criminal Justice Policy

• Drake Castens from Sparta, BA, art

• Ava Corbin from Sparta, BS, Psychology

• Isabella Jones from Sparta, BA, English

• Brooke Kordys from Sparta, MA, Psychology

The following students have been named to the Spring 2022 Deanship List at Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville:

• Nathan Lee Parkinson of Coulterville, Electrical Engineering

• Adrienne Bleem Carril of Ellis Grove, Nursing

• Andrew Todd Luthy of Evansville, undeclared

• Breanna Nicole Elms of Prairie Du Rocher, Special Education

• Reagan Emma Birkner of Red Bud, Early Childhood Education

• Benjamin G. Derousse from Red Bud, undeclared

• Erin Suzanne Hewitt of Red Bud, Criminal Justice Studies

• Zachary Kelsey Hickman of Red Bud, Elementary School

• Red Bud’s Jenna Katherine Salger, unregistered

• Red Bud’s Darrian Brooke Stapleton, Exercise Science

• Claire Suzanne Deterding of Rockwood, unregistered

• Austin Lucas Byer of Steeleville, history

The following students have been named to the Winter 2022 Presidential List at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester, New Hampshire:

• Makinzie Griffith from Chester

• Kathryn O’Connell from Chester

The following students have been named to the spring 2022 deanship roster at State Technical College of Missouri at Linn:

• Hunter Smith by Percy

• Ellie Suhre from Prairie Du Rocher

• William Whelan of Red Bud

• Harrison Higgins of Steeleville

• Christian Koeneman of Steeleville

]]>
Comparison of G Medical Innovations (NASDAQ:GMVD) and Dynatronics (NASDAQ:DYNT) https://sentosoft.com/comparison-of-g-medical-innovations-nasdaqgmvd-and-dynatronics-nasdaqdynt/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 13:07:25 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/comparison-of-g-medical-innovations-nasdaqgmvd-and-dynatronics-nasdaqdynt/ G Medical Innovations (NASDAQ:GMVD – Get Rating) and Dynatronics (NASDAQ:DYNT – Get Rating) are both medical companies, but which is the better deal? We’ll compare the two companies based on their earnings power, profitability, analyst recommendations, institutional ownership, dividends, valuation, and risk. profitability This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on […]]]>

G Medical Innovations (NASDAQ:GMVD – Get Rating) and Dynatronics (NASDAQ:DYNT – Get Rating) are both medical companies, but which is the better deal? We’ll compare the two companies based on their earnings power, profitability, analyst recommendations, institutional ownership, dividends, valuation, and risk.

profitability

This table compares the net margins, return on equity and return on assets of G Medical Innovations and Dynatronics.

net margins return on equity return on investment
G Medical innovations N / A N / A N / A
Dynatronic 1.11% 2.99% 1.31%

Institutional and Insider Ownership

19.5% of Dynatronics shares are held by institutional investors. 11.2% of Dynatronics shares are held by company insiders. Strong institutional ownership is an indication that hedge funds, endowments, and large money managers believe a stock will outperform the market over the long term.

Rating & Result

This table compares revenue, earnings per share (EPS), and valuation for G Medical Innovations and Dynatronics.

gross receipts price/sales ratio net income earnings per share price-earnings ratio
G Medical innovations N / A N / A N / A N / A N / A
Dynatronic $47.80 million 0.25 $2.00 million $0.00 -66,500.00

Dynatronics has higher sales and profits than G Medical Innovations.

Analyst Ratings

This is a summary of the latest reviews and recommendations for G Medical Innovations and Dynatronics as provided by MarketBeat.

sell reviews keep ratings Buy reviews Strong buy recommendations rating score
G Medical innovations 0 0 0 0 N / A
Dynatronic 0 0 2 0 3.00

Dynatronics has a consensus price target of $3.00, indicating a potential upside of 351.13%. Given Dynatronics’ higher potential upside potential, analysts clearly believe that Dynatronics is cheaper than G Medical Innovations.

summary

Dynatronics beats G Medical Innovations on 8 of the 8 factors compared between the two stocks.

G Medical Innovations Company Profile (received rating)

G Medical Innovations Holdings Ltd, together with its subsidiaries, is an early-stage commercial healthcare company engaged in the development of next-generation mobile healthcare and telemedicine solutions in the United States, China and Israel. The Company’s products include Prizma, a plug-and-play medical device that measures vital signs with electronic medical record capabilities and clinical-grade reporting standards; and Extended Holter Patch System, a patient-worn, multi-channel biosensor that continuously collects electrocardiogram data for up to 14 days. It is also developing the Wireless Vital Signs Monitoring System, a solution that provides continuous, real-time monitoring of vital signs and biometrics. In addition, it offers surveillance services including independent diagnostic testing facility surveillance and private surveillance services. The company was founded in 2014 and is based in Rehovot, Israel.

Dynatronics company profile (received rating)

Dynatronics logoDynatronics Corporation, a medical device company, designs, manufactures, and markets physical therapy, rehabilitation, orthopedic, pain management, and athletic training products in the United States. Orthopedic soft bracing products include neck braces, shoulder immobilizers, arm slings, wrist and elbow braces, abdominal and lumbosacral braces, maternity braces, knee immobilizers and braces, ankle walkers and braces, plantar fasciitis splints and cold therapy products. The Company offers therapeutic modality devices that include electrotherapy, ultrasound, phototherapy, therapeutic lasers, shortwave diathermy, radial pulse therapy, heat and cold therapy, compression therapy and electrodes. It also offers electric and manual treatment tables, mat platforms, work tables, parallel bars, exercise stairs, dumbbell racks, treadmills and other related equipment. In addition, the Company provides clinical supplies including exercise bands and tubes, lotions and gels, orthopedic supports, paper products and other related supplies. It markets its products under the Bird & Cronin, Solaris, Hausmann, Physician’s Choice and PROTEAM brands. The company sells its products to orthopedists, physical therapists, chiropractors, athletic trainers, sports medicine specialists, clinics and hospitals, and online. It also exports its products to about 30 countries. Dynatronics Corporation was founded in 1979 and is headquartered in Eagan, Minnesota.



Receive daily news and reviews for G Medical Innovations – Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of the latest news and analysts’ ratings for G Medical Innovations and related companies with MarketBeat.com’s FREE daily email newsletter.

]]>