Womens Rowing – Sento Soft http://sentosoft.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 00:47:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sentosoft.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Womens Rowing – Sento Soft http://sentosoft.com/ 32 32 The women’s and men’s teams meet during the summer barbecue evenings https://sentosoft.com/the-womens-and-mens-teams-meet-during-the-summer-barbecue-evenings/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 00:47:01 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/the-womens-and-mens-teams-meet-during-the-summer-barbecue-evenings/ On a small, handcrafted charcoal grill at Cayuga Inlet, Dan Robinson ’79, former Ithaca College men’s team coach, stood over a flame and cooked hamburgers and sausages for the weekly row cookout. At one table, teammates Zoe Foster ’22 and Bobby MacInnis ’22 played a version of “Guess Who?” with their teammates’ faces instead of […]]]>

On a small, handcrafted charcoal grill at Cayuga Inlet, Dan Robinson ’79, former Ithaca College men’s team coach, stood over a flame and cooked hamburgers and sausages for the weekly row cookout.

At one table, teammates Zoe Foster ’22 and Bobby MacInnis ’22 played a version of “Guess Who?” with their teammates’ faces instead of the normal characters. Others played cornhole while the rest talked to each other or played with the various dogs present.

Robinson announcing his retirement of the March team and his wife, Becky Robinson ’88, head coach of Ithaca College’s women’s crew and skull teams, have hosted weekly summer barbecues for more than 30 years. And while Dan Robinson said it’s meant to be a team event, the event is open to just about anyone.

“Once in a while we have a few alumni in Syracuse [who] will show up,” said Robinson. “The rowing community [in the city] is invited, the college community is invited, and they can bring friends. All these times it’s an open invitation.”

Aside from a handful of athletes and coaches, there were young graduates, professors, children of coaches and members of the Ithaca community involved in rowing. Although there were only about 15 people there on June 23, Robinson said at times they had about three times that number.

“[Tonight’s attendance] is average,” said Robinson. “We had as many as 40 to 45, and we only had four of us.”

MacInnis, who was with the team for three years, said he attended one of the team cookouts for the first time this summer because he hasn’t been in the area in previous summers, but he’s hoping to hit a few more that summer ends.

“I’ll be here all summer doing a class,” MacInnis said. “Well, I don’t know, I can come and see some people. You never know who’s going to be in on these things. … I love this weather, it’s relaxing. And it’s better than just eating in my house, in my kitchen.”

While the team building and summer relaxation are fun, there are other things for some of those in attendance to enjoy. Foster, who was the team’s helmsman, said they come for the dogs that people bring.

“We have a lot of boathouse dogs,” Foster said. “Becki [Robinson] has Rigor and Nala and Crista [Shopis]the men’s assistant trainer, has a dog named Chupa.TThere can be up to four dogs here at any time!”

Foster, like MacInnis, had not attended any of the summer cookouts prior to this year, largely because it was difficult for her to stay in Ithaca for the summer. They said older students and recent graduates tend to make up the bulk of the crowd, but lower-school students also know they’re invited.

“This is my first summer [in Ithaca], and I’ve looked forward to it since I was a freshman,” Foster said. “We don’t really promote it much, but it’s just like, ‘if you’re in the area and you want to hang out on a Thursday and you want to get free food, just come down and hang out.’ It’s super casual.”

Located directly on Cayuga Lake, the Ward Romer Boathouse has a concrete patio outside with picnic tables right next to the water. A few rowers had just returned from a trip on the lake and were still in their training gear.

Robinson said the easy-going nature makes it so fun. He said he spends about $15 a week on burgers and sausages, and anyone else who comes is welcome to bring a side dish or drink, but there’s no pressure to contribute — just to come and have fun .

“We always have stuff, and when we run out, we go out, that’s how it goes,” Robinson said. “It’s completely informal. … And if it rains, we have this big umbrella [for the grill] and we move the picnic tables [inside the boathouse]. We made it rain or shine.”

Jared Anderson ’22, another recent graduate on the team, said that like many college students, he would never turn down a free meal opportunity. But beyond that, he said he’s glad the cookouts give him a chance to see his teammates and coaches one last time before leaving Ithaca. Unlike Foster and MacInnis, Anderson said he went to the cookouts every four years of college.

“I’m really enjoying these,” Anderson said. “It connects us to a lot of people that we won’t see. I’ve just graduated and I get to hang out with alumni and my friends that I might not see as much by the time I finally have to move away.”

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West Norfolk rowers compete in the St Ives Regatta https://sentosoft.com/west-norfolk-rowers-compete-in-the-st-ives-regatta/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/west-norfolk-rowers-compete-in-the-st-ives-regatta/ West Norfolk Rowing Club took a full trailer of boats to compete in St Ives Regatta for the first time in three years and it was some members’ first racing experience. Even the all-day rain didn’t dampen the mood of the Juniors and Masters crews, who represent the club in single, double and four-man races. […]]]>

West Norfolk Rowing Club took a full trailer of boats to compete in St Ives Regatta for the first time in three years and it was some members’ first racing experience.

Even the all-day rain didn’t dampen the mood of the Juniors and Masters crews, who represent the club in single, double and four-man races.

St Ives has a challenging dual track course with buoys around a bend in the River Great Ouse.

The MasD.4x crew consisting of Theo Bailey, Phil Holden, Owen Lewis, Robert John, above, with Fran Fitzgerald and Carol Rose, below right. Photos: Nix Marston (57511432)

Poppy Holden won her WJ15.1x semifinals, the WNRC Open Masters D coxless four with Robert John, Owen Lewis, Phil Holden and Theo Bailey defeated the rival Ely crew to reach their final. Matt Parle in Masters B singles also won his semi-final.

Simon Prior was narrowly beaten at the finish line in his Masters D singles event.

Tom Cory and Erin Fitzgerald-Sutton rode well in their heats.

Pictured top left are Tom Cory, Poppy Holden, Erin Fitzgerald-Sutton while on the right is Helen Pryer, Angela Holford, Liz Palmer and Lisa Chamberlain James.  (57511434)
Pictured top left are Tom Cory, Poppy Holden, Erin Fitzgerald-Sutton while on the right is Helen Pryer, Angela Holford, Liz Palmer and Lisa Chamberlain James. (57511434)

The women’s Masters D double of Carol Rose and Fran Fitzgerald and the Masters D coxless quad of Lisa Chamberlain James, Angela Holford, Liz Palmer and Helen Pryer had to wait in the rain for their events but despite strong team performances came away without wins.

Club supporters watched from wayside pavilions on the regatta field and there was a buzz of gearing up, starting and racing throughout the day.

Helen Pryer, Angela Holford, Liz Palmer and Lisa Chamberlain James.  (57511442)
Helen Pryer, Angela Holford, Liz Palmer and Lisa Chamberlain James. (57511442)

No cutlery for West Norfolk this time, but it was a reminder of how much club members enjoyed attending events in the area before the pandemic.

It is hoped that while rowing regattas and heads are now re-establishing themselves, West Norfolk will continue to train new and existing crews for the competition.

Fran Fitzgerald and Carol Rose.  (57511428)
Fran Fitzgerald and Carol Rose. (57511428)

Anyone interested in the club should email: wnrc.club@gmail.com



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Notre Dame Athletics Friday Fire: Which Sport Should Notre Dame Crash Next? https://sentosoft.com/notre-dame-athletics-friday-fire-which-sport-should-notre-dame-crash-next/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 09:51:54 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/notre-dame-athletics-friday-fire-which-sport-should-notre-dame-crash-next/ Irish baseball team Notre Dame Fighting made us all proud with their run in the College World Series. Although the Irish were ultimately defeated by the Texas A&M AggiesThey’ve earned a lot of respect and credit by upsetting the heavyweight division Tennessee volunteers and Texas longhorns. Aside from kicking off the dead of all dead […]]]>

Irish baseball team Notre Dame Fighting made us all proud with their run in the College World Series. Although the Irish were ultimately defeated by the Texas A&M AggiesThey’ve earned a lot of respect and credit by upsetting the heavyweight division Tennessee volunteers and Texas longhorns. Aside from kicking off the dead of all dead periods in the collegiate world (which has absolutely nothing to do with the existence of this article), this conclusion also begs the question: which party should the Irish topple next?

Notre Dame has achieved a high reputation in many sports. Football is of course the most prominent and will always have a special place since it all started, but many other great programs have sprung up alongside it. From women’s basketball to men’s soccer, hockey to fencing, the Irish compete for titles all year round. Yet there are still areas (like baseball up until the last few years) where Notre Dame is, or would be, an outsider; nor corners of the sporting world where the Irish flag has not been flown. Let’s take a look.

Notre Dame’s men’s golf has had some success in the past Great East, who won eight conference titles from 1995 to 2012 but has been mediocre in conference since joining the ACC and has constantly lingered on the fringes of national competition. That’s also pretty much where the women’s team is, which last competed in an NCAA championship in 2011. The men’s team has a national championship that dates back to 1944.

While there is nothing wrong with these results, the Irish have the potential to aim higher at the national level. It has access to a great course nearby, and the sport undoubtedly fits the culture. With Brian Kelly no longer hogging the links, it might be time for Jack to invest more resources and take this program to the next level.

Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images

Rowing is the oldest collegiate sport in the United States. Do you know who loves old things? Old school Notre Dame alumni and donors, that’s who. Unfortunately, our gold-seated compatriots Passion for antiques did not translate into Irish rowing dominance. Men’s rowing is a club sport with a vibrant and fun campus culture but does not compete at the NCAA level, while the women’s team is a varsity program but is a mediocre competitor in the ACC.

With Notre Dame surrounded on all sides by lakes and rivers, this is a sport that is definitely possible in Notre Dame. Given its association with the old-school prep aesthetic and overall elite college vibe, it would likely make many higher-ups at Notre Dame happy if the Irish were successful at it. All of this makes a prime candidate for revival.

Notre Dame has had some pretty solid tennis players over the years and competed regularly in NCAA tournaments, with the women’s team in particular making themselves felt in several solid post-season runs. However, there was never enough sustained success to establish the Irish program as a powerhouse.

Much like golf, this is a country club sport that many Notre Dame students have either played or will play in their lifetime, so it makes cultural sense and has the added benefit of being playable indoors, which means that harsh winters in South Bend would not be a problem. Breakthrough would just be a matter of finding the right people at the right time.

Notre Dame is one of the OGs of intercollegiate rugby with the oldest college rugby club in the Midwest. The Irish were even crowned national champions in 1966 and have been consistently strong regional players for decades. However, consistent behavioral problems with the club culminated in its eventual dissolution in 1995 by the university. When the club was re-established in 2007, it had a lot of work ahead of it in order to catch up with a national landscape dominated by the California Gold Bears and BYU Cougars alongside a handful of service academies, Ivy League schools, and giants out of thin air (holy shit life university!) The Irish have made great strides in re-emerging as a competitive threat, having played in every college rugby championship tournament since 2010 and recently joining National College Rugby.

2015 Penn Mutual College Rugby Championship

Record number: X159627 TK1

All of that fine work is to be commended, but it would be truly awesome to see Notre Dame reclaim its place as the dominant national force in the sport that has done so much to popularize it at the collegiate level. The university has shown interest in raising the profile of the sport on campus, upgrading it from club to Olympic status and opening up more opportunities for funding. More than any other, rugby feels like a sport where Notre Dame should be a powerhouse – cultural, historical, etc. – and they are already making strides in that direction.

Yes I know. South Bend is thousands of miles from any serious beach volleyball location (or an actual beach). The weather is totally hostile to him and there is little appetite among students and fans. But you know which school does Love beach volleyball?

2022 NCAA Division I Women's Beach Volleyball Championship

Photo by Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

Great rivalries are built on sheer pettiness, and what could be pettier than building an entire collegiate sport from the ground up only to take it away from the other? So let’s do it Jack. Invite Tom Cruise over and teach the Irish the art of beach fun. Train them in the Warren Dunes. Train them on the court behind Lyons Hall. Train them until they are ready to hit the beaches of Troy and conquer them.

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AP was there: subtitle IX “dark times” for female athetes | Taiwan News https://sentosoft.com/ap-was-there-subtitle-ix-dark-times-for-female-athetes-taiwan-news/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 17:08:41 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/ap-was-there-subtitle-ix-dark-times-for-female-athetes-taiwan-news/ In 1974, colleges and universities in the United States began measuring the full effect of Title IX, the landmark 1972 law that required equal treatment for men and women in programs that received federal funding. The domino effects were particularly felt in collegiate athletics, where men’s sport had long received the lion’s share of attention, […]]]>

In 1974, colleges and universities in the United States began measuring the full effect of Title IX, the landmark 1972 law that required equal treatment for men and women in programs that received federal funding.

The domino effects were particularly felt in collegiate athletics, where men’s sport had long received the lion’s share of attention, funding, and support. There was marked resistance among athletic directors to tackling the issue of women’s sport, and The Associated Press put together a five-part series delving into the details.

Below is a story from this series as it appeared in the November 13, 1974 Press and Sun bulletin of Binghamton, New York.

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EDITOR’S NOTE – It will come as no surprise that female athletes do not receive the same treatment as their male counterparts in the nation’s colleges. But they might soon because a law called Title IX says universities must provide equal athletic opportunities for both sexes. Here’s an account of what it was like to be an athlete before Title IX.

By FRED ROTHENBERG

AP sports writer

The typical athletic director in the typical college athletic department isn’t a misogynist. On his desk, next to all the trophies, is a family portrait showing his wife and maybe a daughter or two.

Standing outside his carpeted office is another smiling woman, pouring him coffee, opening his mail, and typing his letters. He will say that he is everything for women.

But in many cases, his sporting budget won’t reflect that.

“I don’t understand what’s going on in the heads of these athletic directors,” said Dan Bakinowski, who volunteered to coach the Boston University women’s team to two national championships last summer. “They have a feeling that the sportswomen are going to walk away. If you think that, you are just fooling yourself.”

“Women’s athletics is not a fad. There are just too many of them out there. You have so much enthusiasm and it won’t stop. The ADs had better get smarter.”

And if colleges are to continue receiving their federal checks for assistance in various areas, some athletic departments will have to change their focus because the long arm of the law is on its way to helping women’s sports.

With Title IX of the Education Act of 1972 outlawing discrimination in all college programs and nearing full enforcement, opportunities are opening up for women’s athletics at many colleges, as Anne Findlay Chamberlain, a first-year fellow at Penn State, commented caused to say:

“We used to have to wear skirts and stockings to a game. But that whole era has changed now and we don’t have to be ashamed of being female athletes, even though I never was.”

The past is not so encouraging for women. Back then were the dark days of women’s sports—an era that still exists on some campuses today—when the men had all the pie and the women were lucky if they got a few crumbs.

Boston University’s women’s team won two national championships last summer without a penny from that school’s athletic department, which gave the men’s team $35,000 last year and two full-time coaches.

“We practiced at 6 a.m. so we wouldn’t get in the way of the men’s team, and also because our volunteer coach (Bakinowski) worked 9-5,” recalls team member Betsy Hochberg.

“In order to compete,” says Hochberg, “we had to borrow boats from other schools. We collected donations with cake sales, raffles and car washes. We even resorted to a rowing marathon. We set up a swimming pool in front of the Studentenwerk and rowed 24 hours a day in two-hour shifts for a week. People came by and threw loose change into the pool.

“It was like begging. But the money had to be raised somehow. BU didn’t want to give it to us… Crew is demanding enough in the best conditions, but practicing with flashlights at 6 in the morning when ice is forming on the oarlocks and you can’t see a meter ahead you, well, it’s almost unbearable.”

Nearly. With all these problems, the team still managed to qualify for the national championships in Oakland, California, which created a new set of problems – transportation and housing for them and their boats.

They borrowed a boat from Radcliffe and ironically beat Radcliffe in the final. They paid their own way to California, at a cost of $1,000 per woman. And they rented the boat trailer, owned by the BU men’s crew, for five cents a mile, which cost about $300 for the 6,000-mile round trip.

“If we had been men,” says Hochberg, “the athletic department couldn’t have done enough for us.”

Many athletic departments have recognized the existence of women, and of course athletics, but not both together.

In the US state of Ohio, women received $40,000 out of a whopping $6 million sports budget last year. This year the women’s bet was raised to $83,000.

“No more four girls in one room. No more cars without heaters freezing our girls to death,” says Phyllis Bailey, manager of Ohio State’s 11 Intercollegiate Women’s Sports. “We drove two tough days to a Big Ten swim meet in Minneapolis last year and two tough days return. The men’s team flew. We just didn’t have the means.”

At Texas A&M, women have 10 sports and a total budget of $200.

Most schools have operated women’s athletics “with a different philosophy than men’s programs,” says John E. Shay, vice president of student affairs at the University of Rhode Island.

“Men’s sports have full-time coaches in most major sports, or are exempt from regular teaching commitments to do coaching,” says Shay. “Women coached the women’s sport in addition to their other duties on campus as an overload.”

Title IX is ultimately intended to create an identical sports philosophy for both genders, but it won’t erase the bad memories.

Gwen Gregory, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) officer currently working on the final Title IX Enforcement Rules, tells the following story:

“A women’s track and field team in Illinois scheduled a meeting a year in advance and invited colleges from around the area. The week before the meet, the men’s running coach called and said he was sorry, but the boys wanted some more exercise on the day of the meet. The meeting has been cancelled.”

Nancy Scannel, a Washington Post reporter, said that Dennis Fosdick, coach of the women’s swim team at Texas A&M, paid $2,200 of his own money to take his team to the national championships, while the university the week before for who got paid men’s team to fly to their national championships.

A businessman whose daughter competes on the Maryland basketball, volleyball and track teams has filed a Title IX complaint against the school. Carl Croydor says the school’s men’s basketball team flew to the University of Virginia — a three-hour bus ride. But “at the height of the energy crisis last December, the university had the women’s basketball team drive itself to Rochester — an eight-hour drive — to compete in the Eastern Regionals.

“The girls didn’t know if they would find enough gas to come back,” Croydor said.

Bakinowski says he stopped getting up at 5:30 a.m. to coach the BU crew because “the university didn’t do anything for us … the athletic department just has a bunch of skewed values.” They just don’t see the injustice when men have to ride for free and women have to go out and sell coffee.”

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AP Corporate Archives contributed to this report.

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For more information on the impact of Title IX, see AP’s full report: https://apnews.com/hub/title-ix Video Timeline: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdgNI6BZpw0

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Virginia in top 15 at 2022 Learfield Directors’ Cup https://sentosoft.com/virginia-in-top-15-at-2022-learfield-directors-cup/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 03:58:42 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/virginia-in-top-15-at-2022-learfield-directors-cup/ Winners have been announced for the 2021-2022 Learfield Directors’ Cup, which is awarded to the colleges and universities with the greatest achievement in all varsity sports. The University of Texas won the Division I Directors’ Cup, while Grand Valley State University and Tufts University took home the Directors’ Cup for Divisions II and III, respectively. […]]]>

Winners have been announced for the 2021-2022 Learfield Directors’ Cup, which is awarded to the colleges and universities with the greatest achievement in all varsity sports. The University of Texas won the Division I Directors’ Cup, while Grand Valley State University and Tufts University took home the Directors’ Cup for Divisions II and III, respectively.

Virginia is currently ranked 11th in the team standings, which is ongoing as the college baseball season concludes with the College World Series this week. Both Texas and Stanford, who hold the top two spots in the Learfield standings, still have baseball teams competing in the College World Series, but there aren’t enough points at stake to allow the Cardinal to beat the Longhorns for to overtake first place.

Check out the current Learfield Division I standings here.

UVA will also receive some points for finishing its baseball team that fell in the regional round of the NCAA tournament, but the Cavaliers currently have 905.00 total points for each of its sports teams:

women golf: 15th place, 50 points
men’s golf: 31st place, 39.5 points
Lacrosse for women: 9th place, 53 points
Men’s Lacrosse: 5th place, 70 points
women rowing: 9th place, 63 points
women’s tennis: 5th place, 73 points
men’s tennis: 1st place, 100 points
Athletics for women: 41st place, 31.5 points
Men’s Athletics: 16th place, 57.75 points
Swimming and diving for women: 1st place, 100 points
Swimming & Diving for men: 10th place, 67.5 points
Indoor track and field for women: 47th place, 25.5 points
Indoor track and field for men: 60th place, 13.5 points
wrestling: 30th place, 43.5 points
field hockey: 9th place, 53 points
Soccer: 5 points
women soccer: 9th place, 64 points

UVA is the third-highest team in the ACC behind Notre Dame (9th) and North Carolina (6th).

Virginia won two NCAA national championships in women’s swimming and diving and men’s tennis in 2021-2022. The Cavaliers also finished in the top 10 in women’s lacrosse, men’s lacrosse, women’s rowing, women’s tennis, men’s swimming and diving, field hockey, and women’s soccer.

Read more from Cavaliers Now

Four UVA swimmers represent Team USA at the FINA World Championships

Upcoming Virginia Basketball ACC Matchups Announced

UVA basketball goal Jamie Kaiser close to decision

Virginia Basketball makes contact with multiple Class of 2024 targets

Kyle Guy trains with the Los Angeles Lakers

Virginia Football adds Minnesota punter Daniel Sparks from transfer portal

Jayden Nixon is a fifth-year player at Johns Hopkins

Virginia Baseball 2022 Season in Review

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Tony Johnson: A Spring Back in the Launch at 81 – Rowing Stories, Features & Interviews https://sentosoft.com/tony-johnson-a-spring-back-in-the-launch-at-81-rowing-stories-features-interviews/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 04:01:22 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/tony-johnson-a-spring-back-in-the-launch-at-81-rowing-stories-features-interviews/ Last spring, the Georgetown Heavyweight Men welcomed longtime coach Tony Johnson back to the starting lineup to guide them for the spring season. As mentioned in row2k’s IRA coverage, Johnson’s final campaign was successful as the Georgetown Heavy Four walked away with a medal. You can read the interview here. In the weeks leading up […]]]>

Last spring, the Georgetown Heavyweight Men welcomed longtime coach Tony Johnson back to the starting lineup to guide them for the spring season. As mentioned in row2k’s IRA coverage, Johnson’s final campaign was successful as the Georgetown Heavy Four walked away with a medal. You can read the interview here.

In the weeks leading up to the IRA, row2k sat down with Coach to hear what it’s like to be behind the megaphone again.

Including this past spring, Johnson, now 81, has coached the Georgetown men’s heavyweight division for a total of 29 seasons (1967-69, 1989-2014, 2022) in addition to his 20 years at Yale, where he won the 1982 National Championship. Coach emeritus at Georgetown since 2014, he has also returned to the starting line to help the women’s team in 2018.

Johnson began rowing at Washington-Lee High School under Charley Butt, Sr., then rowed as a collegiate in Syracuse and competed twice in the men’s pairs Olympics, winning silver in his second games in 1968 with Larry Hough. He also served as the 1972 Olympic coach.


row2k: Can you tell us a bit about what it was like to be back at launch this spring?


Tony Johnson: My first realization of what I was getting into wasn’t actually in the barge, it was in the erg space, and at this point, you know, it’s only five days a week, so eight hours a week. So it was pretty easy, physically. [Once we were on the water] It was definitely a bit difficult for me to get used to the six days a week, early in the morning, and then come back for a few afternoon sessions [laughs].

But in the erg room I noticed that I felt energized. I felt like there was something of me there [coaching] Mindset: teach, learn names, learn people, learn who they were. It’s a really nice group of guys, a very willing group of guys. You listened. They tried. There was resistance to it, and old habits showed up, for her and for me. But the first thing I think of, and I remember it very clearly, is how energetic I felt. Some of that, I suppose, comes from a few years of the pandemic where I didn’t do very much, but it was also retired and not having regular contact with the crew. So it was a lot of fun. I enjoyed it. I enjoyed it at the very beginning. There’s a tiring side: you have to work, and it’s relentless [laughs]. You leave a morning practice and go home and there are all these damn phone calls and emails. But I still found it stimulating.


row2k: Over time, looking back at the scope of your career, has this stuff, this office work piece, changed outside of launch?


Tony Johnson: I don’t know how much has changed. I think the older I get the less tolerance I have for the rest of this stuff [laughs].

But there are new and different problems emerging now, problems the child could have of any kind – row-related and row-not-related, and there are many eyes on what the athletes are doing, and many of them then things work out again.

And there are more rules. I think of some of the issues that came up, and some of them were certainly understandable, especially in this day and age, and some of them were just a pain in the ass, but you have to deal with them and you can’t just count on thinking, ” Well, that’s how I used to do it.

The sport is the same, the rowing is the same. There are things I wanted to learn. I thought, “Well, I’m going to learn more about this new technology” – the boat speed GPS and all that, and some of it’s fun. Helpful for sure.


row2k: Do you find some of these new technologies confirming what you see with the eye? After all, you’ve been training on this river for a long time.

On Carnegie to the 1st race of the 2022 season, his 29th

On Carnegie to the 1st race of the 2022 season, his 29th


Tony Johnson: It’s interesting that you ask that, because I still find my eye to be the most reliable tool I have. I have a feeling that maybe there are people who pay so much attention to the data that they forget you have to row well. Rowing well is work, it is pull, it is drive. Technically we’re looking for perfection and I guess without blowing my own horn I find that I rely on it: on what I see.

I’ve also found that I’m probably at my best the better I know the athletes and that means I have more time than I had with this group. If you start in September, you’ve spent a lot of time with the guys until January, until March. If you start in January, you tie an arm behind your back: It’s just a little bit more difficult… to choose a dash, to choose a tail section, I didn’t have that background. I would ask others about that. “Oh, you petted your first year?” Yes, maybe I should try that. I was at my best as a coach when I knew these people well and I understood that was an issue I had to deal with this spring.


row2k: Because you didn’t have enough knowledge or experience with these intangibles within the group?


Tony Johnson: Absolutely. There’s that value in keeping a log so you can look back and say, ‘Oh, we had a good four a few weeks ago: who was in that four? Maybe I should pay more attention to that line-up.” Absolutely. All of those things would help, but the importance of “knowing people well” is how I would put it.


row2k: Can you reflect a little on the amount of time you’ve spent coaching on the Potomac, or really on that river period? It goes all the way back to Washington-Lee High School under Charley Butt and then here in your pair with Larry Hough also practices for the ’68 Games, right?


Tony Johnson: Yes, there is a familiarity with the river, with the program, with Georgetown. And my style includes all the things that come to mind over time: good rows, mistakes, problems, how I’ve dealt with situations, and have done for many years.


row2k: Tied to the river, to this place?


Tony Johnson: Absolutely, to the Potomac. They are all precious memories.


row2k: What has been the best moment for you since you got back with the program this spring?


Tony Johnson: It’s hard to say: It’s a smaller squad – 20 rowers, three helmsmen, very young: many freshmen and sophomores. It was clear to me right from the start that there is almost no difference between first and second years in the Georgetown crew this year. The sophomores, almost to a man, weren’t on campus as freshmen. And so they were freshman year in college, freshman year in rowing, first year in everything, even though they were a hair older. That was half of our squad but some really good guys and good people too. They are grateful, which was nice and fun. The parents were grateful and supported me, that was good.

And that was fine. I wish we had gone faster. I felt for a long time that we were behind: when we were preparing for the first race, when we were out for two days, I’m doing things that we should have been doing six weeks later. There was a bit of catching up to do all along, and that was until the end of the year.

I thought the crew was a decent crew at the end of the year and yet we’re at the bottom of the field in the Eastern Sprint League and that’s uncomfortable and tough for the guys from a competitive perspective.


row2k: Looking back over the years of racing there, do you feel that the Eastern Sprints is a faster regatta than it used to be?


Tony Johnson: The level of competition is enormous. I think I knew a while back that second and third boats were so much faster than the old 2V and 3V and to see the 4V and 5V and what they do is wonderful. It’s competitive. A high standard.

When this year’s crew went out they rode hard and risked everything and you know we’ve accomplished at least that much and that was good. Both crews did that on The Sprints; They were back in the pack, but at least they saw that they really dug in.

So now I’m back to the fours for the IRA. It’s a decent four, but we still have some issues on how to do really well.


row2k: And that fours event can often be wide open.


Tony Johnson: Yes, well, let’s hope it is.

And it was...

And it was…

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Rowing News | Biggest national youth championship of all time comes to an end, 34 national titles awarded https://sentosoft.com/rowing-news-biggest-national-youth-championship-of-all-time-comes-to-an-end-34-national-titles-awarded/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 19:23:53 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/rowing-news-biggest-national-youth-championship-of-all-time-comes-to-an-end-34-national-titles-awarded/ PERSONNEL REPORTSPHOTO COURTESY OF USROWING There are 34 newly crowned national champions in the youth US rowing world. The 2022 USRowing Youth National Championship was a busy and robust event as it attracted more than 3,500 high school and junior athletes from 210 programs, making it the largest iteration in the event’s history. The men’s […]]]>

PERSONNEL REPORTS
PHOTO COURTESY OF USROWING

There are 34 newly crowned national champions in the youth US rowing world.

The 2022 USRowing Youth National Championship was a busy and robust event as it attracted more than 3,500 high school and junior athletes from 210 programs, making it the largest iteration in the event’s history.

The men’s youth eight was one of many Barnburner races at the event with a solid first place finish from Greenwich but a very, very small gap between second and third. Just 0.08 seconds separated second-placed Newport and third-placed Sarasota.

In the women’s youth eight, the margins were narrow, but not quite as narrow. Chicago took first place with a time of 6:28.075, followed by Greenwich with 6:29.564 and RowAmerica Rye with 6:30.833.

Among the narrow victories were victories that had an even bigger story behind them.

“When we crossed the finish line, we didn’t know that we were first. We thought we didn’t win and when we found out we were so, so excited,” said Imogen Cabot, Winsor School Women’s Youth member.

Cabot’s crew of Isabella Liu, Olivia Hochberg, Evelyn Wells and Emeline Daley took first place in the event and the win came on a sweet note for the crew’s longtime coach.

“It belongs to our coach [Lisa Stone] last season; she has been with us for 24 years. She’s like family to me and I’m just so happy that we were able to have this big last hooray for her. It was such a fun race. It was so much fun having that final sprint, so much fun being so close the whole time. I love rowing.”

The full results of the event can be viewed here.

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Paignton host first championship of the season https://sentosoft.com/paignton-host-first-championship-of-the-season/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 06:01:06 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/paignton-host-first-championship-of-the-season/ Paignton Rowing Club hosted the first regatta of the 2022 West of England ARA Championship season over a 1,000 meter course at Tor Bay. Conditions for the Paignton Regatta were choppy for the 97 competitors on a sunny and windy day. The home club, who will also host the South Coast Rowing Championships on September […]]]>

Paignton Rowing Club hosted the first regatta of the 2022 West of England ARA Championship season over a 1,000 meter course at Tor Bay.

Conditions for the Paignton Regatta were choppy for the 97 competitors on a sunny and windy day.

The home club, who will also host the South Coast Rowing Championships on September 10, had an exceptional day with numerous event wins and the points trophy.

Wins for Paignton crews were:

Men’s Champion Coxsquad: Steve Warrender, Ben Smith, Mike Lister, Jason Higgins, James Tookey (Coxswain).

Men’s Rookies in Cox Four: Nick Brown, Ethan Frost, Tristan Northcott, Yuri Allasia, Erin Mooney (Cox).

Men under 18 coxswain fours: Keira Brueton, Freya Martin, Oliver Chalk and Sam Brueton, Erin Mooney (coxswain).

Men under 14 with helmsman: Oliver Chalk, Hugo Dossett, Joshua Bradley, Marcus Green, Eva Birchell (helmsman).

Men’s U14 doubles sculls: Hugo Dossett, Joshua Bradley.

Rookie One of the Ladies: Keira Brueton.

Men Under 15 Singles Sculls: Sam Brueton

Men Under 16 Singles Sculls: Sam Brueton

There was also success for Torquay with Harrison Green in his very first race when he won the U16 men’s singles.

Paignton Regatta results:

Men Senior A Coxed Fours 1 Bideford Reds 2 Paignton

Men’s Senior B Coxed Four 1 Bideford Reds 2 Paignton

Men Senior C Coxed Four 1 Bideford Reds 2 Plymouth 3 Paignton

Men Novice Coxed Four 1 Paignton 2 Bideford Reds 3 Plymouth

Gentlemen under 18 Coxed Fours 1 Paignton 2 Paignton

Coxed men under 16 in sculls 1 Bideford Reds 2 Paignton

Coxed men under 14 in sculls 1 Paignton 2 Bideford Reds

Men’s Champion coxed four 1 Paignton 2 Paignton/Plymouth

Ladies Senior C Coxed Fours 1 Castle Dore 2 Plymouth

Ladies Novice Coxsquad 1 Dart Totnes 2 Castle Dore 3 Paignton

Ladies Under 18 Coxsquad 1 Dart Totnes 2

Ladies Under 16 Coxed Sculls 1 Plymouth 2 Dart Totnes 3 Castle Dore

Coxswain open scull 1 Bideford ARC 2 Paignton 3 Paignton

Open male navigable couples 1 Paignton 2 Plymouth

Men’s Senior C Double Sculls 1 Plymouth

Men’s Under 18 Double Sculls 1 Bideford Blues 2 Paignton

Men Under 15 Double Sculls 1 Bideford Reds 2 Bideford Reds

Men Under 14 Double Sculls 1 Paignton 2 Paignton

Ladies Senior C Double Sculls 1 Plymouth University 2 Paignton

Ladies Novice Double Sculls 1 Bideford Blues 2 Dart Totnes

Ladies Under 17 Double Sculls 1 Plymouth 2 Paignton

Ladies Under 16 Double Sculls 1 Dart Totnes 2 Bideford Reds

Ladies Under 15 Double Sculls 1 Plymouth 2 Castle Dore

Mixed Under 14 Double Sculls 1 Plymouth 2 Paignton

Men’s Senior C-One 1 Robin Smith – Castle Dore, 2 George Woodall – Plymouth University, 3 Rob Harris – Paignton

Men’s Rookie One 1 Barney Evans – Bideford Blues, 2 Yuri Allasia – Paignton, 3 Alex Rowland – Bideford Reds

Men under 18 One 1 Harry Fanson – Bideford Blues, 2 Barney Evans – Bideford Blues

Men U17 Ones 1 Sam Brueton – Paignton, 2 David del Rio Empran – Plymouth

Men Under 16 Ones 1 Harrison Green – Torquay, 2 Yuri Allasia – Paignton, 3 Sam Brueton – Paignton

Men Under 15 One 1 Sam Brueton – Paignton

Men Under 14 Ones 1 Isaac Fugil – Castle Dore, 2 Finley Cloak – Bideford Blues, 3 Owen Thomas – Plymouth

Ladies Senior C One Twos 1 Molly Mifsud – Dart Totnes

Women’s Rookie Singles 1 Keira Brueton – Paignton

Women’s U18 Singles 1 Grace Asquith – Castle Dore, 2 Ellie Fowlds – Dart Totnes

Women’s U16 Ones 1 Rosalie Fowler – Bideford Reds, 2 Lucy Sanders – Dart Totnes, 3 Erin Shippey – Dart Totnes

Ladies Under 15 One 1 Lexi Reeves – Bideford Blues

Meanwhile, Brixham Gig Rowing Club is extremely grateful to have recently received financial support from two companies via the Actionfunder.org website; a website that connects organizations looking for funding with organizations looking for funding.

Greene King, a Bury St Edmunds based brewery with pubs across the country, generously donated £3,000 to enable the Rowing Club to commission a new set of bespoke wooden oars for use by both men’s and women’s teams.

The oars have been ordered and will hopefully be delivered in around 8 weeks and will then be used by racing teams in regattas across Devon and Cornwall.

South West Water, were also very generous, giving £600 to help one of their club members attend a British Rowing Club coaching course.

Tony Mould, the member selected to take part, has now completed much of the course and has already put his newfound skills to good use which has been of great use to the rowing teams he has taken on the water.

Most community based sports clubs find it difficult to be as inclusive as possible, keeping annual membership fees at an affordable level while paying overhead, maintaining and buying new equipment, and Brixham Gig Rowing Club is no different.

Receiving grants from organizations like Greene King and South West Water is a fantastic boost for the club, allowing it to grow and move forward.

ActionFunder.org is a great place to start when an organization is looking for funding.

It’s a simple process to submit a profile of your organization and details of a project you wish to fund, and once submitted, simply wait for your project to find a match.

Paul Goddard, Treasurer of Brixham Gig Rowing Club said: “ActionFunder is brilliant. Easy to use and it works. ActionFunder keeps you fully informed and once funding was secured, the funds came through within weeks.”

He recommends any club in the Torbay area looking for funding opportunities to take a look.

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Success for the Peterborough City rowers in their own anniversary regatta https://sentosoft.com/success-for-the-peterborough-city-rowers-in-their-own-anniversary-regatta/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 10:03:00 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/success-for-the-peterborough-city-rowers-in-their-own-anniversary-regatta/ City’s winning helmsman, from left, Alex Hughes, Will Kerry, Tracey Rushton-Thorpe (helmsman), Jonathan Ibbott and Joshua Seagrave. Photo: Sarah Watson With over 60 visiting teams and an appearance from guest of honor Karen Daber, Deputy Lieutenant Cambridgeshire, both days saw racing across the 1000m lake at City’s Thorpe Meadows base and the home rowers amassed […]]]>
City’s winning helmsman, from left, Alex Hughes, Will Kerry, Tracey Rushton-Thorpe (helmsman), Jonathan Ibbott and Joshua Seagrave. Photo: Sarah Watson

With over 60 visiting teams and an appearance from guest of honor Karen Daber, Deputy Lieutenant Cambridgeshire, both days saw racing across the 1000m lake at City’s Thorpe Meadows base and the home rowers amassed a total of 17 wins and 15 second places.

Joshua Seagrave won his first race alongside pair partner Bradley Willies. They won Saturday’s open pair event by an impressive 16 seconds over Nottingham Trent University.

Seagrave also won the Open Band 3 Coxed Fours the following day along with Will Kerry, Jonathan Ibbott, Alex Hughes and Cox Tracey Rushton-Thorpe.

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Peterborough City’s Tim Ellis in action at the club’s anniversary regatta. Photo: David Lowndes.

Another doubles winner was Kate Read, who teamed with Linda Dennis to win the women’s Masters B doubles by 15 seconds over Warwick Boat Club.

She also won the Women’s Masters B singles, crossing the line two seconds ahead of Northwich Rowing Club in a thrilling final.

Bert Papworth won the Open J16 title by an impressive 21 seconds over Globe Rowing Club.

He also teamed with Tom Calver, Jack Wakefield-Lilley and Daniel Armstrong to win the Open Band 1 Coxless Quads the following day.

A crew from the City Rowing Club Masters at the Jubilee Regatta. Photo: David Lowndes.

Ella Darrington and Devonne Piccaver convincingly won the women’s J18 doubles, then joined Alice Dovey and Sophie Pepper (Bewl Bridge Rowing Club) to win the coxless women’s J18 squares.

Hannah Fitzjohn piloted the winning J15 quad of Peggy Papworth, Emma Dennis, Emma Calver and Emily Fitzjohn while James Garfield and James Ryder had no trouble in the Open J16 doubles event to win the title 41 seconds ahead of Globe Rowing Club.

City Junior Boys saw further success on Saturday as William Tee and Isaac Malcolm won the Open J14 doubles and Matt Hand the J18 singles.

More wins followed Sunday, starting with Claire Widdowson and Gina Gould in the Women’s Masters A doubles.

Anita Carter and Joan Heath won the women’s Masters F doubles while Paul Scutts and Barry McCann won the Masters E doubles.

Ian Palmer and Dave Smith of Leicester Rowing Club won the Open Masters C doubles

The final win came from Al Ryder, Jim Burt, Steve Tuck, Rob Dennis, Jim Bichard, Jaish Mahan, Jack Ward, Keith Blackman and Cox Ericha K-Pardoe, who won the Open Masters E/F Eights.

A crew from Peterborough City also took part in the Metropolitan Regatta at the weekend.

Harriet Drake-Lee and Ellie Cooke competed in the women’s doubles 2000m championship event at Dorney Lake.

Of the 22 doubles that competed in their event, they finished 4th in the time trial, which qualified them for the A final.

In their final they put up a good fight in the tough conditions and crossed the finish line in fifth place, just six seconds behind NUI Galway Boat Club in fourth place.

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High school recap: Rowers from St. Joe’s, Nardin and Canisius bring home hardware | Secondary school https://sentosoft.com/high-school-recap-rowers-from-st-joes-nardin-and-canisius-bring-home-hardware-secondary-school/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 03:50:49 +0000 https://sentosoft.com/high-school-recap-rowers-from-st-joes-nardin-and-canisius-bring-home-hardware-secondary-school/ St. Joe’s, Nardin and Canisius returned home from St. Catherine’s on Sunday as winners of the 75th Annual Canadian Secondary Schools Rowing Association Championships. St. Joe’s took home gold in the Seniors 4+ with Michael Cannavo, Lars Finlayson, Alex Glenn, Christian Trotter and Chris Zilliox. Nardin won the senior women’s 4+ national championship with Haley […]]]>

St. Joe’s, Nardin and Canisius returned home from St. Catherine’s on Sunday as winners of the 75th Annual Canadian Secondary Schools Rowing Association Championships.

St. Joe’s took home gold in the Seniors 4+ with Michael Cannavo, Lars Finlayson, Alex Glenn, Christian Trotter and Chris Zilliox.

Nardin won the senior women’s 4+ national championship with Haley McMullen and Lauren Bauer, Esther Littlefield, Mary Mangan and Lucy Fortner.

Canisius won the Juniors 8+ and Juniors 4+. The winning crew in the 8+ were Maxwell Burget, Peter Cross, Liam Feeney, James Dodman, Mark Kadiev, Meer Renschlear, Toe Toe, Alex Pusateri and Theadore Hibbard. The winning crew in the 4+ were Burget, Cross, Feeney, Dodman and Hibbard.

Each school also had additional medalists.

St. Joe’s won silver in the Seniors 8+ with Cannavo, Finlayson, Glenn, Trotter, Kyan Chase, Ethan Kania, Joseph Rebhan, Anthony DePinto and Zilliox. The Marauders Juniors 4+ won bronze (Sam Prelewicz, James O’Neill, Luke Ludwig, Charles Hawthorn and Ben Mazurkiewicz).

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Nardin finished third in the Women’s Senior 8+, fourth in the Lightweight 4, and fifth in the Junior 8.

Canisius placed third in the Seniors’ Lightweight 4 (Adam Whitmann, Evan Izatt, Brendan Johnson, Will Oh and Adamo Shugg). The Junior Lightweight 4 finished fifth with five tenths of a second.

Lewiston-Porter’s Rocco Randazzo shot 77 points in the second round of the New York State Public High School Athletic Association championship Monday and finished ninth with a two-day total of 148 points at the Mark Twain Course in Elmira.

Randazzo, the Section VI champion, earned a spot on the All-State team by finishing in the top 20.

Thomas Finn of Locust Valley in Section VIII shot a 1-over-72 to finish with a 138 overall and a four-shot win.

Eighth-grader from Lancaster, Cole Jones, followed up his 71st round with an 80 in the first round to finish in 17th place with a two-day total of 151.

Williamsville East’s Tyler Delisanti finished his first round with a second straight 77 and finished tied for 29th with 154. Lancaster’s Michael Wolsky shot an 84 in the second round to finish with 163.

Williamsville South’s Julian Mogensen was next among the Section VI golfers with 77 and 165 overall, followed by Westfield’s Darien Swanson (82-83-165), East Aurora’s Peter Jantzi (88-81-169) and Eliel Rodriguez of Hutch Tech (92). -85-177).

Section VI finished sixth overall with a total score of 1,100. Section VIII was the winner with 1,037 strokes.

Clarence senior Tori Leach shot an 82 with a total of 161 over two days and placed 11th in the New York State Public High School Athletic Association Championships at McGregor Links and Country Club in Wilton.

Leach shot a 79 in the first round on Sunday.

Kennedy Sweddick of Albany Academy (Section II) won the tournament by four shots and two rounds of a par 72 straight.

Section VI champion Rosie Dinunzio of Clarence shot 81 in the second round to finish with a two-day total of plus 27,171 and a tie for 29th place.

Anika Michel von Clarence followed her 85 with an 87 for a 172.

Clarence’s Kylie Dean shot 88 and finished with 177.

Depews Lauren Jaskier’s second round of 84 was 14 better than her first round and she finished in the top 50 with 182 overall.

Southwestern’s Josephine Corey shot a 95 after her 96 in the first round for a total of 191.

Lancaster’s Sophia Brown had 97 in the second round (195 overall) and teammate Riley Morris had 108 in the second round (200 overall).

The Section VI team finished fifth with a total of 1,241. First place Ursuline Academy helped Section I win the team title with a total of 1,102. Section VIII finished second with 1,122.

• Lewiston-Porter Girls Lacrosse star Sophie Massaro has verbally committed to Division II Mercyhurst. She was second in Section VI with 79 goals that season.

• Hamburg announced three signings: Clarissa O’Connor to Gannon University for cheerleading, Nolan Heavern to Alfred State for baseball and Courtney Schaeffer to RIT for cross country and track and field.

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